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ABOVE: On September 19, 1977, the Milwau- kee Road was still using pairs of Fairbanks Morse switchers to work the yard at Savanna, Ill. Milwaukee Road H10-44's 770 and 779 would last a couple years longer in the service of the railroad. PRESTON COOK


RIGHT: U.S. Army H12-44 No. 1834 once served the Seneca Army Depot at Romulus, New York, where it handled 30 to 100 cars per week on 42 miles of track at the base. In 1993, it was declared surplus and purchased by the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum in Rush, New York, where it contin- ues to operate for the public. CHRISTOPHER HAUF


were quite innovative, each powered by an 8-cylinder 1200 horsepower OP en- gine which provided a minimum of 800 horsepower for traction and a maxi- mum of 400 horsepower for electric “head end” power (HEP). The use of electric train heating and air condition- ing had been discovered to be more effi- cient than steam heat as early as 1937, but its application on the railroads was limited by the large fleets of conven- tional steam heat passenger equipment that survived intact as long as steam locomotives were present in passenger service. The introduction of specialized lightweight trains with captive consists provided the opportunity to apply all- electric auxiliaries. In service, the P-12-42 locomotives and the Talgo trains suffered from all


52 DECEMBER 2011 • RAILFAN.COM


the common problems of many of the other lightweight trains. They were perceived by the riding public as being a cheaper and less comfortable substi- tute for the conventional equipment, and were introduced at a time when the interstate highways were being devel- oped and were making longer-distance automobile travel competitive with short- and medium-distance railroad passenger service. Fairbanks Morse sold two each of the P-12-42 locomo- tives to the Boston & Maine and the New Haven railroads. The equipment was relatively short-lived on both lines.


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