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miles north of Duluth, the trains back- tracked to Marbles, where they again met 2719. Then it was south again for more photos. Residents gawked at the constant train activity, particularly in the nine miles Marbles and Knife Riv- er, Minn., where there were nine train movements in a single day! Action switched to Duluth on Sept.


TOP: Erie Mining Company F9A 4211 and F9B 4222 smoke it up during a run-by on the Little Sucker River Bridge at Palmers on September 10. The trailing unit was acting as a real life “dummy” unit for the photographers! ABOVE: The night of September 7 finds Soo Line No. 2719 fired up for a photo session at the Lake Superior Railroad Museum in Duluth.


Engineer Frank Christopherson and Conductor Doug Buell patiently uncou- pled the F-units at each photo run. At Marbles, 2719 cut off and headed into Two Harbors to wye. When it returned, 2719 posed alongside the 2500A, recre- ating a scene that took place several times as the Soo Line dieselized in the 1940s and ’50s. On the return trip, sev- eral run-bys were made in great after- noon light, with the last at Milepost 7, just outside of Duluth. On Sept. 9, Railfan Weekend formal-


ly began with a night photo session held at the depot in downtown Two Harbors, rather than in Duluth. The featured “stars” were Duluth, South Shore & At- lantic RS1 No. 101 and Erie Mining F9A 4211. With the historic Duluth & Iron Range depot as a backdrop, the as- sembled group of 49 photographers got several shots, with lighting by RAILFAN


& RAILROAD editor Steve Barry. After the night session the locomotives head- ed to Marbles for the night. Saturday, Sept. 10, found two trains


lined up for departure at Marbles. South Shore 101 pulled two heavy- weight passenger cars, while Erie Min- ing 4211 and F9B 4222 were on the north end of a 21-car empty ore train, which had been brought up to Marbles earlier. On the south end of the ore cars was Soo FP7 2500A. Lining up the pow- er this way allowed photographers to shoot the Erie F9s, then the train would pull ahead and they could photo- graph the Soo F-unit. The two trains al- so would meet Soo Line 2719 running on its regular Duluth-Two Harbors schedule. It was a photo bonanza as the trains


posed and made several run-bys. After meeting 2719 at Palmers siding 16


11. Ready to head north for Palmers was DM&IR SD18 193 and Missabe Railroad Historical Society (MRHS) SD-M 316. They pulled 21 ore cars trailed by MRHS’s ex-Missabe caboose C-205. Since it was not possible to fit 49 fans into one caboose, several partici- pants chased the train. There was a meet scheduled at Palmers with Soo 2719, but because of the dry conditions and fire danger, the steam locomotive was not used that day, with the Erie and Soo F-units substituting. After the Missabe units ran around


the ore train at Palmers, it headed back to Duluth, with more run-bys. Upon ar- rival at the Museum and the most am- bitious LSRM Railfan Weekend ever was history. The fact that so many trains were op-


erated safely, using every available train crew, and operated on time is a tribute to the great skill of the volun- teers and staff at the Lake Superior Railroad Museum and North Shore Scenic Railroad. Even though the oper- ating crews and staff were stretched to the limit, everyone exhibited a profes- sional attitude. The Museum’s Tim Schandel and Richard Bergsrud in par- ticular put in long hours — in some cas- es late into the night. Without their work, the weekend would not have been a success story it was. It’s doubt- ful that many other groups in the Unit- ed States could have executed the am- bitious schedule and operations necessary that insured the success of these events.


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