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(1) The fi rst step in planning your oven should be to choose a heavy black cooking pot, a cardboard box that will easily fi t it and a medium cookie sheet. This will be the interior of the oven. (2) The outer structure of the oven should be a cardboard box several inches larger than the interior box. (3) A frame allowing it to be angled into the sun, supports the oven. Several pieces of scrap wood glued to the outer box will help support its weight. (4) Scrap 2x2 boards glued vertically to the sides of the inner box support it and the weight of the gimbal on which the pot rests. (5) Here, all the supports are glued in place. Note that they have been drilled with 1/4" holes to accommodate carriage bolts to support the oven and the gimbal. (6) To prevent heat loss, the space between the two boxes is insulated with shredded paper from an offi ce shredder.


oven is fi nding a suitable cardboard box for the oven interior. To do this, I started with the cooking pot that I planned to use — a cast iron 5-quart casserole that I found on sale at a big-box store. Since I wanted to pas- teurize water in the oven, I knew that I’d have to have some way of keep- ing the pot level when the oven was tilted into the sun. My plan was to use a medium cookie sheet (11x13") and some wire to create a pivoting gimbal. With that in mind, I knew the inner box for my oven would have to be big enough to accommodate


that cookie sheet and allow it room to pivot. After a bit of scrounging, I found a corrugated cardboard box that measured: 4x12x14". With the inner box in hand, fi nd


an outer box that is about 6" larger in every dimension. This outer box sup- ports the oven and provides enough air space between the two for insula- tion to prevent heat loss. To allow the oven to be mounted


into a frame and easily adjusted, cut four pieces of scrap wood — two pieces of 2x4 and two squares of ply- wood — and drill 1/4" holes through


them near one end. Using carpenter’s glue, glue these pieces to the top edg- es of opposing sides of the outer box — 2x4s on the inside and plywood on the outside. Center the holes along the side of the box and insert 6" long 1/4" carriage bolts and nuts through the holes to align them. Make sure to insert the bolts from the inside out. It and the wood will support the weight of the oven. You’ll also need to glue scraps of


wood on the outside of the inner box. They should be the same height as the outer box and glued vertically to


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(7) The fl aps of the outer box are trimmed to fold around the inner box, then glued and taped in place. The fl aps of the inner box will serve as mounting surfaces for the refl ector panels. (8) Coat the inside of the inner box with glue and line it with aluminum foil. This will help refl ect sunlight onto the cooking pot. (9) It’s made by drilling holes in a medium cookie sheet for wire “A-frame” hangers. (10) Here the gimbal is shown hung from the car- riage bolts in the interior box. (11) The “window” of the oven is made from oven roasting bags, scrap lumber and glue. (12) Glue blocks at the corners of the wood frame pro- vide strength and keep the structure square.


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