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example for four people for a week or so.


H FOOD


Keep a minimum of one week’s food on hand.


• 24 cans of fruits and veggies • 12 cans of meats and tuna • 12 cans of soup and stew • 4 pounds of rice and beans • Manual can opener


WATER


• 1 to 1.5 gallons per person, per day • One case of bottled water • 12 gallons of water


• Four 2.5-gallon containers of water • Large pot to boil water • Iodine or treatment tablets


SHELTER


• Two large 9x9' (or larger) PVC tarps • Nails, staple gun and hammer • Duct tape


• Defensive tools/weapons HEAT • Propane “Heater Buddy”


• Six 1-pound bottles of propane • Six pack of sterno • Box of candles


LIGHT


• Two flashlights w/ extra batteries • Headlamp w/ extra batteries


• Two oil lamps w/ 1 gallon of lamp oil • Box of candles • Four chem-lights


MEDICAL • First aid kit


• Extra box of band-aids • Trauma dressing • Rx meds


HYGIENE


• 5-gallon bucket w/ lid • Toilet seat for bucket • Toilet paper • Baby wipes


• Feminine-hygiene products RECOVERY


• Hand tools: saw, hammer, pry bar, rope, pulley, carabiner • Chain saw and fuel


• Copies of important documents stored in separate location


16


been a good choice. But a .22 rifle will do just as well. A dog is a good deter- rent as well as an extra set of ears.


Heat Depending on your climate and


time of year this may be a very impor- tant need. It may very well be a deal breaker as far as staying in your home vs. going to a shelter if you have no way to keep yourself warm for an ex- tended emergency. If your home has a fireplace that is capable of burning wood, bravo! All you need is wood. Just like your food storage, start stack- ing up extra wood when you get the chance. This is your survival wood. Stash away cut up limbs, scrap wood and any small trees you cut down. You will be glad you did so you won’t have to burn the dining room table when the time comes. Other sources of heat include kerosene and propane heaters. These both need to be used in a well-ventilated area to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Small sources of heat include candles, cans of ster- no and even those hot-hands pocket warmers. Be careful with whatever method you use. Be aware of carbon monoxide build up as well as any gas leaks resulting from the disaster itself.


Light There are lots of options here.


Propane or white gas lanterns, re- chargeable lanterns, chem-lights, bat- tery-powered flashlights, oil lamps, candles, headlamps, small LED lights and so on. Keep a couple flashlights with extra batteries on hand. A head- lamp is handy to keep your hands free while you work. A couple of oil lamps will keep darkness at bay at night. A few candles will supplement the oil lamps and you should be fine. What- ever methods you choose, make sure


you keep fuel and batteries on hand and stored safely. Gas lanterns need mantles and spare parts. Generators will power lights and a lot of other appliances. They are great pieces of equipment to have. Good ones that produce enough useful power can be expensive. They will need to be run a couple times a year to check function and keep them in good shape. Stored fuel needs to be kept fresh and stable.


Medical Keep a well-stocked first aid kit


handy. Supplement that with current trauma dressings, ACE bandages and medicine. Get trained in first aid and CPR. Make sure everyone knows where the first aid kit is located. Keep one in your vehicle as well. It could serve as a backup in case your pri- mary is buried in debris. If anyone in your family takes medicine on a regular basis, talk to your doctor and see if they can get a 90-day supply for disaster preparedness.


Hygiene Shit happens. If the toilets don’t


work, you will need a way to handle bodily waste. A 5-gallon bucket can be fitted with a toilet seat and lid. Line it with a plastic bag and use a little RV toilet deodorizer in that. Keep the bucket in an area away from your group of people. Change the bag daily if you can and bury the waste or store it in a sealable trash can that you can throw away after the disaster. For longer term you may need to dig a la- trine or cat hole. Don’t forget to stock plenty of toilet paper. Baby wipes will be useful when running water is a pre- mium. A bar of soap and some sham- poo is cheap insurance to stock up. Babies will need a supply of diapers on hand. This is where cloth diapers


REALITY CHECK • 2012 SPECIAL EDITION 2,000 calories per person, per day.


ere is a checklist to help you get started. This is an


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