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Number 10 cans and 5-gallon buckets are the cornerstone of long-term food storage and provide bulk storage in easy-to-handle sizes.


is most of our food supply outside of grain is not grown domestically. We import millions of tons of fruits and vegetables each year. That food sup- ply is dependent on hundreds of thou- sands of semi-trucks moving the food around the country. Like every other industry in the United States, food production and supply is vertically integrated and delivered with no time delay. We are no longer an agrarian society. Less than 3 percent of the US population is involved in produc- tion agriculture. That is a really low amount of people growing food for the rest of us. As a result, the 100-acre and


Home canned goods can greatly stretch your stored foods. Pickles, beans, jam and soups are easy to can and provide needed fl avor to a storage food diet.


larger family farms that dotted the countryside have been broken up and subdivided. Mini farms and ranches now take up most of this space.


Mini Farms In Tennessee, 10- to 15-acre mini


farms are easy to buy and maintain. Someone who currently works full time can still have a working mini farm. If managed correctly 10 to 15 acres can provide for the needs of a small family. Meat, vegetables, fruit and fi ber can be produced right on your own property. If you don’t al- ready have the property then you


should look for a couple of things off the bat. Make sure to get a property that percolation (perc) rate is high — the rate at which water moves through soil. You do not want to be dealing with a septic issue during a crisis. Look for property that has a well dug, or other wells in the area. A natural above ground spring will suffi ce in some areas of the country, but you should ask around and see when the areas springs have a dry spell. Having water on site is a major issue. Have your soil tested and make sure that you are able to grow a garden. If you were planning on having livestock, I would seek a piece of property that has the ability to have a stock tank or pond (depending on what area of the country you live in) put in. A great source for information


Our fuel tanks are 500 gallons each. We take the hoses off when not in use, to prevent fuel loss.


WWW.AMERICANHANDGUNNER.COM


Number 10 cans with a shelf life of more than 10 years.


about growing crops and raising animals is your local agricultural ex- tension offi ce and your local United States Department of Agriculture or USDA offi ce. Here you will be able to fi nd out about local growing seasons, prevailing animal and plant diseases in the area and possibly fi nd out if any grants are available to help with your new farm. Many times the extension agency or USDA offi ce will have ex- perts available in certain fi elds that can come and give recommendations


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