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gray coating offers excellent corro- sion resistance to the blade’s 1095 carbon steel. The Pathfinder’s corru- gated Micarta handle offers superb grip and a wide finger guard gives the user abundant finger protection. An adjustable Kydex sheath with emer- gency whistle is included. The Bushcraft movement, rooted


in practices of Bushmen of the low- er hemisphere, is almost religious in zeal — and the knife is a huge part of the zeitgeist. The Spyderco Bushcraft knife has a 4" blade in a clean de- sign topped off with an ample, nicely sculpted G10 handle. The blade is made of O-1 high-carbon tool steel that can be easily sharpened in the wild. Like the Finnish puukko knife, the blade grind is short, geared more toward working chores than the deep grinds found on skinners, although the blade is up to the task. Spyderco did their homework here, encapsu- lating everything you’d ever want or need in a Bushcrafting knife. A black leather sheath is included. You don’t necessarily need a guru


to satisfy your survival instincts; there are plenty of knives to choose from. The Boker Plus Rold, another excellent fixed blade design by Jesper Voxnaes, is 11" of pure cutting pleasure. The Rold’s 6.2" V-ground clip-point blade is made for tough field chores and is plenty large enough to chop small trees for shelter. D2 blade steel makes for easy sharpening in the wild and a nicely sculpted handle makes for comfortable handling. A lanyard and Kydex sheath are included. What such diversity says is that the


survivalist movement has a wide and varied following with a wide selec- tion of knives to go with it. Better yet, hunters and other outdoorsmen can also use these knives for their various needs. In other words, there’s more than one way to skin a cat!


Surging Slip Joints A slip joint, simply defined, is a


folding knife with a backspring and no blade locking mechanism. These are the pocketknives many of us grew up with, some passed down from gen- erations, and they are experiencing a rebirth among knife users and collec- tors in old and new form. One reason slip joint folders are


making a comeback is the increase of government restrictions both here in the US and abroad. In June 2010, a district attorney in Manhattan tight- ened restrictions on knife owners and dealers by banning what they loosely define as gravity knives. This essen- tially made any knife with a locking blade illegal. While the ruling will be


WWW.AMERICANHANDGUNNER.COM


tested in the courts, it is New York State law as of this writing. Spyderco is the only knife manu-


facturer that has jumped into the modern slip joint market feet first and has a broad line of folders called SLIP- ITS. There are six different models of the UK Penknife and the company has introduced a smaller version, the Urban model. On the high end is the Terzuola model which features car- bon fiber scales and leather lanyard. These knives weren’t affected by the New York ruling and Spyderco is one of the few manufacturers shipping folding knives to the state today. The 1930s to ’60s were boom times pocketknives. Traditional slip


for


joints — such as those by companies like W.R. Case & Sons, Queen Cutlery Co., Schatt & Morgan, Buck Knives, Victorinox and Boker of Germany — never left the planet. There has been a renewed interest in this segment of the market with newer manufacturers and once defunct, resurrected brands joining the fray. KA-BAR and Great Eastern Cutlery- both with excellent collector bases are two examples of companies offering top-shelf pocket- knives in traditional patterns. The old patterns abound, includ-


ing popular standbys like the Trap- per, Barlow and Stockman to more obscure ones like the Harness Jack and Elephant Toenail (also known as a Sunfish). Aside from the fact you don’t have to mess with a blade lock, there’s a good case to be made for car- rying a slip joint. Another distinct ad- vantage: multi-blade folders offer you a selection of edges and tools that a single-blade knife simply can’t. You can buy offshore produced knives in stag handles for as low as 25 bucks, and upscale, hand-produced limited editions for around a hundred.


To The Rescue! Tactical knives have become more


specialized over the years and no- where is that more evident than in the new breed of rescue folder. The Ger- ber Hinderer Rescue is loaded with features. This knife was designed by custom knifemaker Rick Hinderer, who has years of experience as a fire- fighter and EMT. He knows his stuff. The blade 3.5" blade is fully serrated with a blunted tip to deter accidental cutting. On the base is a glass breaker and foldout seatbelt/clothing cutter; on the side a slot that serves as an oxygen tank wrench. Included is bal- listic nylon sheath. Simpler in concept but with its own


advantages is the SOG Flash Rescue. Available in orange or black handles, the Flash Rescue (a derivative of their


Flash series folders) incorporates the company’s S.A.T. speed assist blade opening mechanism, which accesses the blade at the flick of the thumb. The 3.5" AUS 8 stainless steel blade has a nice row of serrations for cut- ting webbing and the tip is blunted to decrease the chance of injury. A safety catch is located on the handle to prevent accidental engagement. Likewise, CRKT took their popu-


lar Kit Carson designed M16 folder and converted it to a rescue model. Emergency orange handles were add- ed, a seatbelt cutter was milled into the blade flipper, and a tungsten car- bide glass breaker was incorporated into the base. The M16-ZER has all the goodness of the original model including a 3.75" triple-point tanto blade, partially serrated for even more versatility. CRKT’s patented Lawks safety adds greater security. As you can see, there is no lack of


edged weapons and tools available in the cutlery market today. Such luxury in choices allows you to tailor your knife needs to suit your lifestyle and activities. *


FOR MORE INFO:


BENCHMADE KNIVES www.benchmade.com (800) 800-7427


BOKER USA, INC. www.boker.de/us


www.buckknives.com (800) 326-2825


(800) 835-6433 BUCK KNIVES


CHRIS REEVE KNIVES www.chrisreeve.com


(208) 375-0367


COLUMBIA RIVER KNIFE & TOOL www.crkt.com


www.gerbergear.com (800) 950-6161


(800) 891-3100 GERBERGEAR


GREAT EASTERN CUTLERY www.greateasterncutlery.net


(814) 827-3411


KA-BAR KNIVES, INC. www.kabar.com


www.sogknives.com (888) 405-6433


(800) 282-0130 SOG


www.spyderco.com (800) 525-7770


SPYDERCO, INC.


www.topsknives.com (208) 542-0113


TOPS KNIVES 53


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