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Roy installed a whole-house generator when they moved into their home outside of Joplin in 2008. It’s paid for itself many times over.


Citizens set up temporary restaurants like this on many corners. These young men took it upon themselves to find a couple of bent barbecues, went to a local food store and bought hotdogs, then went to work feeding workers and the homeless. Roy donated hotdogs, coolers and sundry supplies to many in need, courtesy of Brownells, the gunsmithing supply company, who sent 15 boxes of basic supplies.


on the roads was stunning. I saw vehicles with flats everywhere, not counting the thousands of totally destroyed vehicles. I did see cars in trees, and big trees tossed hundreds of yards. Every tree in the path of the tornado was stripped of bark. FEMA says that takes at least 160 mph. Winds here were over 200 mph. So far, we’re the sixth deadliest tornado since records were kept, and FEMA says they have never seen this kind of damage from a single tornado. So, that kind of wind and damage means the ground is littered with things out to get you. Get one of those “Plug” kits to plug holes in your ties. They’re handy anyway (I use ‘em all the time out here) but doubly useful when you need to get to the hospital. Get a 12- volt air pump that plugs into your car lighter. Prepare now.


Additions


Since all this, I’ve bought: A pack of four 12x18' blue tarps (cover your roof if you lose parts of


WWW.AMERICANHANDGUNNER.COM


George Michalopoulos, owner of Mythos restaurant in Jop- lin, lost power but not his business. He called employees in and together and in over three days, they fed thousands of meals from his rapidly thawing freezer. George’s was the typical response by Joplin businesses and residents.


it), live under it, loan it to a neigh- bor, cover furniture, keep you warm or more. A bundle of 1x2" wood in 8'


lengths (use it to hold down edges of tarps nailed to the roof). More Slime! Bought another NOAA radio as


a backup. Keep my 500-gallon propane tank


topped off. I make sure to: Keep my chainsaw fuel fresh and


the saws tested. Keep the tractor tank always full. Have work gloves always handy, along with strong boots.


Final Thoughts Keep in mind in a big disaster;


California has historically been slow to handle things. And many citizens are simply not used to doing anything for themselves. If the light switch doesn’t work, they call 911. In the past, there has been much panic, hys- teria and a failure to self-rescue much


of the time, putting even more strain on public agencies who were expected to make it all better ASAP. Think Ka- trina. Be part of the solution, not part of the problem. I was very impressed by the local


community groups here in Joplin, who simply rolled up their sleeves and handled it — and are still handling it. I could go on and on. Nobody here is blaming anyone or anything; they are simply fixing what’s broken. And I’m here to tell you; police agencies everywhere could learn some lessons about mutual aid and response by lis- tening to how the emergency response agencies around here handled this. As a retired cop, I came away deeply impressed by the cops, fire fighters, paramedics, National Guard and city workers here. I don’t mean to be ugly about it,


but we witnessed people having to survive during this disaster. The ones who were prepared did well; the ones who weren’t prepared, suffered … and are still suffering for it. *


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