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hot water heater in, which most don’t. Smarter is to have a simple junction box installed allowing you to switch off from the grid. You then plug your generator right into your home and it powers what you want using the plugs in your house as usual. However, depending on the size of


Sometimes the rescuers needed rescuing. This Joplin fire department station was hit hard, putting the engine out of com- mission when it was needed most.


the generator, you need to be careful what you run or you can overload it. A 2,000-watt generator is as cheap as $250 and can run most freezers and such easily. Keep a couple of 5-gallon plastic gas containers stabilized with Sea Foam (it works better than Sta- bil, in my own tests). Use Premium in the cans since it has no alcohol and is more stable. Every six months, put the gas in your car, and fill the cans again. Pain in the ass? Sorta’. But when the power fails you’ll be so damn happy you did it. From what I’ve seen, you need to


Insurance companies responded with temporary offices to help victims. With over 6,000 homes wiped off the map, insurance companies were writing checks within one day of the disaster!


struggled to hold onto him. He too died. You can’t imagine this sort of power until you see the results.


Injuries The big trauma happened dur-


ing the hit. Amputations, avulsions, piercings from flying shrapnel, head injuries, blunt trauma and more. If you were outside, you would have been machine-gunned with shrapnel, splinters, glass, building material and anything else, at velocities that would kill you instantly. I saw a wooden rul- er driven through the steel roof of a car, half into the passenger compart- ment, half out. It would be good to have Quick-


Clot and big bandages or even a box of Kotex. Be prepared to bind wounds to stop bleeding and splint limbs. There were hundreds of piercing wounds from flying objects, and bleeding


Roy loaded his truck and util- ity trailer with food, water, fuel and tools and respond- ed to help out.


needed to be stopped instantly on those wounds. Are you prepared? Post tornado, clean up injuries


were mostly foot injuries (stepping on up-turned nails), blunt trauma from beams falling or debris moving, heat-related problems (it was 100 de- grees or more), and minor abrasions, cuts and such. Actually, the hospitals were overloaded immediately after the storm, but after the initial pa- tient load, things returned to normal fast, except for long-term recovery of many injured patients.


Power If you don’t have a small generator,


even if you’re in a city, you’re nuts. Get a 5KW model and a couple of long extension cords. If you have elec- tric hot water heaters, you’ll need at least the 5KW one. But even that’s only if you have a way to plug your


be able to live on your own for three to five days or so. By then, in virtually every disaster I’ve seen, help arrives. But until then, it sure is nice to be warm, dry, have power, basic medical care and food. Trust me on that.


Bug-Out-Bag I had a Bug-Out-Bag (BOB) ready


but added another now with changes of clothing, heavy leather gloves, more batteries (AAs for lights and radios), old boots, a blue tarp and an- other 100 feet of white nylon cord. Here’s what I keep in the basic BOB: Water (buy the silver “bags” of


emergency water), a bit of food, change of clothing, good quality flashlights using standard batteries. A portable weather radio with AM/FM capabilities. A cheap, full rain suit (or two or three — it rained hard for two days after the hit here), a blue tarp (keeps rain off you, among a hun- dred other uses), 100 feet of 3/8" nylon cord, good hat, change of shoes, work gloves, sunglasses, water bottle, water purifier device (one of those osmosis-


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