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The Small Farm R. Jacob Herman T


about being self-suffi cient? The idea of not only surviving but also living well on your own property. Being a surviv- alist, prepper, and self-suffi cient go hand in hand. When I think of being self-suffi cient I think of being able to provide all or most of my needs over an extremely drawn out pe- riod of time. We are talking past basic disaster prepared- ness. Beyond the 6-month supply of freeze-dried food or- dered from a preparedness company. Self-suffi ciency is being able to grow, build, or barter for your needs.


he term survival means different things to different people. Some view it as surviving a winter storm while others are planning on an economic collapse. What


When you set up a small piece of


property for long-term survival needs you have to include basic needs. You must have a way to grow food for yourself and your animals. You must have shelter in which to keep out of the elements. Finally, you must have a means to provide yourself with a steady supply of water. Over the past 100 years, Ameri-


cans as a whole have left the farm. The American public still has an idyl- lic view of farming; the white picket fence and big porch with the Ameri- can farmer lovingly picking each veg- etable by hand. Although, the reality


Young broccolis started in cold frames. 26


Natures alarm clock: the mature rooster. REALITY CHECK • 2012 SPECIAL EDITION


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