This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
“Disaster tools”: Every household should keep a set of tools for post disaster recovery. In addition to ba- sic carpentry-type hand tools, anyone serious about disaster preps should maintain a chainsaw with fuel and spare chain, a gas shut off tool, and “pioneer” tools such as axes and shovels. There is a lot of work to be done after a disaster. A good selection of the right tools will make that work a lot easier and safer.


Homeland Security and the Centers for Disease Control all agree that you should be prepared. Flu pandemic lasts for months and come in waves of 30 days at a time, recedes and then comes back in another wave of illness and death for another 30 days. It can repeat this cycle for half a year. During that time, expect travel to be restricted, and “just in time” delivery of food and household goods will be severely interrupted. Store shelves will be empty. Gas stations will be dry. People will stay home from work out of fear of contracting the flu. That means workers won’t always show up at the water plant, the power plant or pick up your garbage. You see how this could be a huge disaster, lasting a long time. So how can you prepare for such an event? The same as the other disasters we discussed, but for a longer term. Looking at each of these events we find common needs regardless of


14


the circumstances: food, water, shel- ter, heat, light, medical, hygiene and recovery. We will discuss each one of these as a separate category.


Food On average, you will need about


2,000 calories per adult, per day and about 1,200 to 1,500 calories a day, per child depending on their age. So, it becomes a simple mathemat- ics problem. One of the best ways to start storing extra food is by buying an extra item each time you do your regular grocery shopping. Pick up an extra can of soup, an extra box of mac n’ cheese or an extra bag of rice. In no time you will have a couple weeks of food stored up. This parallels your regular pantry and could be referred to as your “survival pantry.” Focus on buying the types of food you and your family normally eat. During the stress of a disaster is not the time to try new foods you have not eaten be-


fore. Buy nonperishable foods such as canned goods, sealed bags of rice or beans, gravy mixes and jars of pea- nut butter, sauces and so on. Write the date of purchase on each one, and start a rotation schedule attached to the shelves or cabinet where you keep the food. As a back up to your survival pan-


try, consider a second layer of food. Many prepared people store dried rice, beans and grains inside 5-gallon buckets, commonly found at bakeries or delicatessens. You can put a lot of rice in a 5-gallon bucket for a few dol- lars and it will keep for years. If you ever need it, that rice will really help stretch your survival pantry as the di- saster wears on into weeks rather than days. Store all your food in a cool, dry place. A spare closet or an unused space like the area under the base- ment stairs is a good place to put some shelves stocked with food. Canned food will remain edible for years, even


REALITY CHECK • 2012 SPECIAL EDITION


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180