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on Monday. Mai Tai, Daryl Homan’s Tiger down from Vancouver Island, took the bullet for the day – and the week. To placate the rest of the frustrated racers, the race committee tossed Mardi Gras beads, which adorned sailors throughout the rest of the week. Tuesday was a different story. The


Class P08, “Moore On,” “Stimulus Package,” “Arturo the Aqua Boy” and “Shenanigans” preparing to round the mark. Photo by Jan Anderson.


Back at the tent, nightly live music


such as the sailor-favorite Seattle band Gertrude’s Hearse (which counts among its members a racer or two), kept the crowds dancing and warm during the week’s chilly dusk hours. Thursday’s tropical themed tradition began with Corinthian Yacht Club’s race committee donning this year’s limited edition Hawaiian shirts. Later, the party migrated to the Navy Dock after the rum tent closed and continued till midnight to the reggae tunes of Andy O.


Monday’s weather whetted the


racing whistle by teasing the fleet with flip-flopping shifts – by as much as 30 degrees in opposite directions between the start line and the weather mark, according to Charley Rapthkopf, Corinthian Yacht Club PRO, who with his expert army of volunteers, chase boats and finish boats, managed to pull off some creative courses during the week.


Only the P1 class, consisting mainly of Flying Tigers, was able to finish a race


Paul Bennett's “Duck N Goose” racing hard the in Melges 24 division. Photo by Jan Anderson.


big boats in Class P0 featured five 1D35s, three down from Canada and included The Shadow, with Canadian Olympian Ross MacDonald on board for the first half of the week. But it was the amateur crew aboard John Hoag’s Shrek who earned the day’s top spot. The RC flew the “round the ends” flag requiring over-earlies – of which there were many, thanks to the 1.5 knot push -- to round either the pin or committee boat if over early at the start or within the last minute of the start countdown. After the start it was a race to the predictable westward elevator up Penn Cove’s north beach. Though some, like White Cloud in P0, took it a little too far, leaving a divot in the mud as their keel encountered the north beach’s shifty sand bar. By Wednesday, the crews were feeling


a bit more confident, as demonstrated by Chester Hibbert’s Jack Rabbit who port tacked the fleet in the first race. A spinnaker parade to a gybe mark rounding, just off the dock of the Red Barn in Coupeville, delighted the waiting spectators, who reciprocated with hoots, cheers, and jesting jeers. In the second race, Shrek lost the pins to the forward hatch when setting the kite at the weather mark. Not missing a beat, though, and in a demonstration of good teamwork, the rounding included the call “Hatch coming back, kite coming out!” Thursday morning dawned with a


grey marine layer and a weather report calling for a strong southerly with drizzle and gusts. Appropriately Charlie and company set up in Saratoga Passage between Whidbey Island’s eastern shores and the west side of Camano Island, but the weather reports turned out wrong – no precipitation and the competitors got in three solid races in up to 12 knots in flat seas with blue sky popping through by the second start. It was a White Cloud kind of day with the crew on the Cookson horizoning their fleet. “Playing the runners made a big difference,” said rigger Chris Tutmark. With such perfect conditions it was the finish-line committee boat that got


48° NORTH, SEPTEMBER 2010 PAGE 66


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