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car, visitors to this 120-acre National Historic Landmark will find lots to see and do. With its gray painted St. Paul’s Church—built in 1879—complete with white trim, charming little boutiques and antique shops, a weekend farmers’ market, a deserted lumber mill, and a smattering of outdoor activities, you’ll find lots to see and do. The Port Gamble History Museum features professionally designed dioramas of typical early Port Gamble scenes—the whole town is an amateur historian’s dream.


Whether coming by boat or by


There’s also the Port Gamble Cybertour—a walking tour that covers a square block of the beautifully restored historic houses that date from the town’s establishment in 1853, and includes the old cemetery and a great hilltop view of the Hood Canal Bridge. The Cybertour is downloadable off the Internet on the Port Gamble website: www.portgamble.com And if you time your trip right, you can participate in some of the Northwest’s most eclectic festivals ranging from a civil war re- enactment and a medieval fair held in June, to a vintage car show in July, and a rollicking Maritime Music Festival in August. But first things first – where to


anchor your boat. Port Gamble Bay is your best bet for the most sheltered anchorage. This unobstructed channel is east of the now derelict mill, with depths up to 23 feet. Anchorage is good with a muddy bottom and gently sloping sides. The downside of anchoring in the bay is that you’ll need to row quite a way up the channel to the town. Your best alternative is to anchor off the point near the township itself. You might be swinging a little more on the hook as you’ll be on the side of Hood Canal, but you will not have to row very far. Look for a sandy beach just west of the township, anchor offshore there, and row in to the sandy beach.


Start with the walking tour that


takes you past 13 historic houses and buildings plus the cemetery. Port Gamble was the longest continuously operating lumber mill town in North America from 1853 to 1995. The most spectacular building is the Walker-


48° NORTH, SEPTEMBER 2010 PAGE 41


Right: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Built 1879. The church’s architecture reflects founders New England roots.


Below: Port Gamble’s shady, streets lined with towering maples and elms.


Ames House facing out over the mill, resembling a two-story Victorian doll’s house, the lower half painted yellow, with green wavy tiles on the second floor giving it a distinctive ocean look. Next door is the town’s centerpiece


building, the former Pope and Talbot Office. Now housing the General Store, it’s a tourist shop and cafe with the museum on its lower level. Under the new and enthusiastic management of Erik Kleiva, it provides a fascinating


place to browse, while the café offers a tasty, newly revamped menu. Open for breakfast and lunch, the café has a gourmet touch to its simple dishes. e.g. the Blue Burger, an organic beef patty topped with blue cheese, balsamic onion jam, tomato, lettuce and roasted garlic mayo on a toasted Kaiser bun. Try the fried salmon (if it’s in season) with sweet potato fries—mine was as good as you’ll find in any top line seafood restaurant in Seattle.


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