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nanotimes News in Brief

able to use these new insights within research fields that are already well established in Mainz. “We will be investigating the effects of nanoparticles on vari- ous microorganisms.” Professor Dr Ajit Varma, Amity Institute of Microbial Technology (AIMT), Amity University Uttar Pradesh, In- dia: http://www.amity.edu/aims/

Professor Dr Helmut König, Institute of Microbiology and Wine Research, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität: http://www.uni-mainz.de/FB/Biologie/Mikrobiologie/

index.html

Oelmuller R., Sherameti I., Tripathi S., Varma A.: Piri- formospora indica, a cultivable root endophyte with mul- tiple biotechnological applications, In: Symbiosis, Vol. 49(2009), 1-17.

The Winner of the 2010 Millennium Technology Prize is Professor Michael Grätzel from Swit- zerland for his third generation, low cost, dye- sensitized solar cells. President of the Republic of Finland Tarja Halonen handed the EUR 800,000 Grand Prize and the prize trophy “Peak” to Profes- sor Grätzel today at the Grand Award Ceremony at the Finnish National Opera, Helsinki.

The Winner of the 2010 Millennium Technology Prize, Professor Michael Grätzel, Director of the Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), has responded to the challenge with his dye-sensitized solar cells.

“The constraint of solar energy has traditionally been its price. ‚Grätzel cells‘ provide a more af-

10-05/06 :: May/June 2010

fordable way of harnessing solar energy. Grätzel‘s innovation is likely to have an important role in low-cost, large-scale solutions for renewable en- ergy,” says the President and CEO of Technology Academy Finland, Dr Ainomaija Haarla, explaining why Grätzel was selected as the winner.

The two other 2010 Millennium Laureates were awarded each awarded prizes of EUR 150,000 and “Peak” trophies at the Award Ceremony. This year‘s Millennium Laureates answer some of the challenges of sustainable development and energy consumption.

The initial innovation of Professor Sir Richard Friend, organic Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), was a crucial milestone in plastic electronics. Electronic paper, cheap organic solar cells and illuminating wall paper are examples of the revolutionary future products his work has made possible. Friend is the Cavendish Professor of Physics at the University of Cambridge.

Stephen Furber, Professor of Computer Engi- neering at the University of Manchester, is the principal designer of the ARM 32-bit RISC micro- processor, an innovation that revolutionised mobile electronics. The ingeniously designed processor enabled the development of cheap, powerful handheld, battery-operated devices. In the past 25 years nearly 20 billion ARM based chips have been manufactured. http://www.millenniumprize.fi

Christoph Keplinger, Martin Kaltenbrunner, Nikita Ar- nold, and Siegfried Bauer: Röntgen’s electrode-free

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