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The Air Show Connection

Penn Yan Aero supplies and services the engines used by top aerobatics pilots. Take Spencer Suderman (www.spencersuderman. com), renowned stunt pilot who regularly executes maneuvers such as the Inverted Flat Spin, Lomcevak, Double Hammerhead, Torque Roll, Avalanche and Tail Slide in his Meteor Pitts biplane. He uses a Penn Yan Aero overhauled and certified Lycoming AEIO-540-D4A5 that makes 260- plus horsepower at 2,700 RPM. The Red Eagles aerobatics

team (www.redeagleairsports. com) employs Penn Yan Aero built engines in their two custom-built biplanes. Lead pilot Dan McClung has a Lycoming experimental 375- horse power AEIO-540 engine in his Talon Eagle. Pilot Buck Roetman runs a Lycoming experimental 260-horsepower IO-360 engine in his Red Eagle II biplane. And Kent Gorton (www. kentgortonairsports.com) has equipped his Extra 300 monoplane with a Penn Yan Aero Lycoming AEIO-540 Angle Valve engine that delivers 375 horsepower.

engine cylinders are a particular specialty for Penn Yan Aero: “We can overhaul existing steel

and nickel cylinders or replace them with new OEM parts,” he says. “Our overhauled cylinders are produced using FAA-approved processes, and our overhauled- cylinder warranties are the same as new OEM cylinder warranties.” After all the problems have

been identified and remedied, the assembly begins. Penn Yan Aero overhauls engines to OEM new specifications. The company also can provide overhauled, rebuilt and new Lycoming and Continental engines as desired. Once the engine has been

reassembled with all its new parts, it is time for testing. The engine is taken to a test cell where it runs for 90 minutes at a time; 30 minutes at peak power. “Our engines need to prove themselves before they leave our facility,” says Middlebrook. “So we put the engine through rigorous and tough testing, checking all critical indices to make sure the engine performs to Penn Yan Aero standards.” When the test is over, the fluids and filters are removed

and examined. A different team again inspects the engine as it is prepared for shipment back to the customer. On average, Penn Yan Aero

processes 275 to 325 engines through its facility every year. The company also repairs propeller strikes and IRANs (inspect, repair as necessary).

Warehouse Full of Parts

Penn Yan Aero’s people have centuries of collective experience working on aircraft engines. “As a result, we have gotten to know the ins-and-outs of every Continental and Lycoming engine there is,” Bill Middlebrook says. “We know how they wear, what tends to cause problems, what their symptoms mean, and how best to keep them working properly.” To provide fast service to

its customers, Penn Yan Aero maintains a warehouse full of parts and cores. That’s not common these days, as many MROs try to reduce costs by maintaining inventory on a just-in-time basis. But a large inventory is a smart strategy for a company who services many older engines.

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