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THE NEED FOR FIRST RATE YACHT MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE HAS NEVER BEEN GREATER WITH SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY BEING THE MOST IMPORTANT AREAS TO COVER ALLOWING THE CREW TO RUN AN EFFICIENT YACHT AND BUSINESS WORDS: CLAIRE GRIFFITHS


S


ome of us will remember the bell pull in the salon that tinkled in the kitchen and summoned the maid to her mistress. Or the orders barked from the bridge. It wasn’t all that


long ago. And few now navigate by the stars except to relive the romance of olden days. In their distant past, some yacht captains did work that way: but whether they remember it nostalgically or with a sense of nausea, the digital age pounced fast and fearsomely and systems on superyachts changed lightening quick. And they’re not finished yet: This month ONBOARD magazine consults the systems experts to find out what’s new and crucial to run a tip-top-tight and safe ship.


If the barking orders and the bell pulls are finished, any management system still needs to be as simple as possible for all the crew to use, not just the engineers, suggests David Clarke at Superyacht Operating Systems (SOS). It should allow the crew to enter and update their own details and upload certificates, whether they’re on board or ashore. And it should have a built-in verification process for the captain or purser to monitor. All data entered should seamlessly populate crew lists, digital In/Out Board, Vacation Tracker, Hours of Rest, Familiarisation, Muster List, and so on without the need to re-enter duplicate data. “Lastly,” says Clarke, “all this information needs to be accessible to the


80 | SUMMER 2019 | ONBOARD


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