search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Following the trip, the management company continued to fail the crew – finally they were permitted shore leave to seek help, but even after their approved psychologist had signed them all off to return to work, they all received word that their contracts had been terminated – long story short, the crew were effectively forced into signing away any rights they had. At time of writing, Nautilus had taken the case on to fight on the crew’s behalf for compensation. Financial compensation is one thing (if they receive any) but the lasting effects of a trauma like this which is dealt with so horrifically will no doubt be felt by that crew for years to come.


SHEREEN OPENLY TALKS ABOUT HER JOURNEY ON HER BLOG WEBSITE, TRAUMAONTOUR.COM WHICH SHE DESCRIBES AS “ONE WOMAN’S


MISSION TO EXPLORE WELLBEING AND RECOVER FROM TRAUMA”


Shereen Soliman, a young woman working in the industry for some years, suffered a brutal attack in St Maarten some years ago when she was between jobs; a man attempted to rape and murder her. It left her with acute Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Shereen is an inspiration, quite frankly, she’s taken her experience and has used it to help others, as well as having returned to the yachting industry on a freelance basis.


Shereen openly talks about her journey on her blog website, traumaontour.com which she describes as “one woman’s mission to explore wellbeing and recover from trauma”. Her aim is to continue learning and to share the lessons with the reader, whilst also teaching and coaching about emotional intelligence, trauma recovery and self-care. One of her side projects, Shereen has recently been involved with the launching of a new Facebook page called ‘Yacht Crew – That’s Not Okay’ along with Nathan Skinner, and Matteo Ichino.


This online forum exists to raise awareness of unsafe and destructive practices in the yachting industry, with the aim to improve working conditions for all. Crew are encouraged to send PMs to the group admins where they can remain anonymous and ergo be protected. Their aim is to point them in the right direction to get the appropriate support, be it a safety, or personal matter.


Speaking of support, what resources are available to us? In the first incidence, we can consider what we can do to protect ourselves following a traumatic event. Karine recommends these protective strategies:


• Refrain from making any major decisions or life changes


• Take time to process the emotional response to the event and acknowledge what you have just been through


• Avoid self medication or overuse of alcohol or drugs to cope


• Reach out for support from the people who care about you and you feel comfortable talking to


38 | SUMMER 2019 | ONBOARD


• Try to maintain a normal routine. Keep busy and structure your day


• Make time to practise mindfulness. Engage in relaxation activities whether it is a walk on the beach, deep breathing exercises, meditation or yoga


• Be aware of the feelings that come up and find a healthy way to express them, whether it is writing it down in a journal or talking to a close friend


• Seek professional help - make contact with a counsellor or psychologist


Shereen’s website offers great resources on different therapies and how to find what’s right for you, from one on one therapy with a trained counsellor, to holistic alternatives. If you’re not ready to talk to a person in real life yet, there are apps out there you could use – and lots of counsellors will offer online chat, video, or phone counselling. Betterhelp, Talkspace, Breakthrough, these services will match you with a suitable counsellor who can best fit your needs. It’s important to remember that what works for one person may not work for the next, so if you don’t find the right resource, keep looking.


With mental health awareness on the increase, let’s hope we see more and more resources popping up, and perhaps more importantly for us in yachting, more emphasis on training, learning and development in managing the aftermath of an onboard trauma from owners, captains and management companies.


Please refer to the side panel for a list of resources.


If you’re reading this and any of this is resonating with you, please don’t feel that you’re alone. Reach out to any of the sources listed in this article, a friend, a loved one, or your doctor. Keep well.


HELP AT HAND


The Crew Coach offer a counselling service, details of which can be found on their website www.thecrewcoach.com


The International Seafarers Welfare and Assistance Network offer free, confidential, multilingual helplines for seafarers and their families www.www.seafarers.org


Shereen Solimon’s website www.traumaontour.com


The Professional Yachting Association (PYA) www.pya.org


Nautilus International www.nautilusint.org/en


British Counselling Services – Sarah Heyler Tel: +34 663 890 287 Email: info@britishcounsellingservice.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152