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IT’S GOOD TO TALK


WORKING IN SUPERYACHTS IS ALREADY A HIGH STRESS ENVIRONMENT, ADDING A TRAUMATIC EVENT TO OUR DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS COULD, POSSIBLY, TIP US OVER THE EDGE. HEALTH AWARENESS AND ENCOURAGING EVERYONE TO TALK IS PARAMOUNT WORDS: ERICA LAY


G


one are the days when we demonstrate that ‘stiff upper lip’ mentality, or ‘grin and bear it’… or are they? It seems each year we are hearing about more tragic events, such


as accidental deaths, serious injuries, or even suicide. How are crew and management companies addressing these events? Are they still being swept under the rug? Why does it take a devastating accident for management companies or owners to


put some sort of process in place for coping with the aftermath? Let’s start with defining the word ‘trauma’. The dictionary defines it as ‘a deeply distressing or disturbing experience’. This could be psychological, i.e. a personal trauma like witnessing a terrible accident, or physical, such as suffering a serious injury or attack. Trauma affects people in different ways and responses can be extremely individual.


36 | SUMMER 2019 | ONBOARD


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