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I ALWAYS WANT TO BE WORKING, AND IF I CAN MOVE AROUND AND BE COMFORTABLE, THEN I’LL WORK BETTER AND THAT’S WHAT MAIN GIVES ME


love with. For the first time it was something that I could do as I wanted with. Chartering is fine but you are aware, all the time, that it is someone else’s property.


Even so, something was still missing, and for Armani, it was a lack of ubiquity in the design process. For all its qualities, Mariù was still a craft that was ‘off the shelf’, as it were… and the shelf wasn’t designed by him.“It had to be me, from start to finish,” he says – hence, Main.


It’s true to say there are few things that reward the designer as much as time on the sea. “The privacy is nice. In no hotel in the world will you get the same level of privacy. But what I like most is the fact you are in somewhere purpose-built. When it came to designing Main, it was all me.”


While Codecasa created an incredible exterior, everything inside was Armani’s vision - the ability to make something from nothing, and to wear it like a pair of jeans… that was the special thing, and in reality, those principles are mirrored in the fashion industry itself.


The yacht, which was built at Codecasa’s Viareggio shipyard in Tuscany, can accommodate up to 12 guests, and comes with zero speed stabilisers, which restrict movement on the yacht when it is at anchor, thus increasing on-board comfort.


The craft is powered by two Caterpillar 2,479hp diesel engines, has a top speed of 17 knots and can achieve a maximum range of 6,910 nautical miles at 14 knots. In addition, water tanks store an impressive 30,000 litres of fresh water.


It is a statement every bit as strong as a well-tailored suit, and reward for a fashion forefather who has achieved everything that could have been asked of a modest shop window dresser in 1950s Italy.


“My biggest, most obvious regret is that I didn’t take care of myself enough,” Armani has told a national newspaper in 2015, in referencing a work/life balance that, you feel, only in later life is he finally beginning to master. “I have always taken care of other people, more than myself. So much that sometimes I should have quit my job, or divided my time better between public and private life.”


While his love affair with the sea is without doubt, it seems the calling of the mainland will always take Armani back. “That’s because this is a job that absorbs you completely from morning to night. I tried to take people, friends, or dates and bring them into my own work life, instead of doing the opposite, but it rarely worked.”


Time spent on the yacht, and away from the catwalk, clearly represents a diversion Giorgio Armani thrives on. The similarities between the two remain - both exude elegance, class, style and luxury; but unusually, with yachts, he has brought bona fide fashion to the seas – there is not a hint of white, nor bright lighting, or marble interiors.


The greater truth though is that whilst separating two worlds, maybe he has succeeded only in bringing his own – fashion – closer to him.


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2019 | 29


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