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By Nelson Moura


Not exactly a total blackout


New gaming data transfer instructions aimed at ‘protecting players’ interests, says DICJ


T


he Director of the Gaming Inspection and Co-ordination Bureau (DICJ), Paulo Martins Chan, said that the instruction issued by his department limiting the transfer of players and the transfer of


information concerning players’ gaming activities by gaming concessionaires or junkets “protect the interests of the players” and will allow the healthy development of the sector. The instruction, revealed first hand by Macau News


Agency (MNA) two days before being enforced on September 23rd, requires gaming operators and junkets to obtain authorisation by the DICJ to transfer any information to third parties concerning the gaming activities of players. This information covers data such as a player’s


personal data, place of origin or nationality, and profession, as well as the gambling client’s activity or other information on their gaming activity, such as time of entry into and out of the casino, time spent at the gaming table, the number of bets, the credit, the amount of the bet placed, etc. “It’s a specific area […] it is up to the DICJ to regulate the


sector and is up to us to instruct [the sector]. This sector is a bit different from the general population and under the law, gaming concessionaires and junkets have to collaborate with us. We issued this instruction to maintain the healthy


20 NOVEMBER 2019


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