search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
STATESIDE


political resignation. Mayor Frank Gilliam Jr. admitted to stealing more than $87,000 from a local youth athletic program for his personal use. Come January, he faces a possible 20 years in prison when sentenced. Gilliam is the fourth Atlantic City mayor in 30-plus years


to be convicted of a crime, not to mention other city council people. It is no wonder that as governor, Christie directed the state’s takeover of Atlantic City’s finances years ago. The current Governor, Phil Murphy, campaigned on eliminating state oversight. However, his recent economic report acknowledged Atlantic City’s troubled economic leadership. Murphy will maintain the state’s supervision until at least late 2021. The casino companies have billions invested and taxpayers need confidence in the people at the top. Funny how easily promises are made when it’s an abstract and not someone’s actual responsibility. Murphy seems to have since gotten the memo since the stakes are so high. I agree with Christie’s labeling these politicians as corrupt, incompetent or both. Sadly, Atlantic City is far from being the only region with


 


disastrous leaders impacting gaming companies. These issues pervade all states and local jurisdictions. One of the most egregious examples was Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast in 2005. Louisiana’s then-governor, the late Kathleen Blanco, and New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin (now serving a 10-year federal prison sentence for wire fraud and taking $500,000 in bribes for city contracts) ignored federal evacuation recommendations until it was too late.


   


People were trapped, many died, and Harrah’s casino was smack in the middle of the city’s downtown neighborhood. In adjacent Mississippi, the physical destruction was


worse. Winds had ravaged numerous casinos, including beauties like MGM’s Beau Rivage. Machines and money littered the highways. Six years later, I traveled to Mississippi to assess their progress. Biloxi and Gulfport were almost completely rebuilt by then, thanks to former Governor Haley Barbour’s solid stewardship. He oversaw rewritten legislation to bring the riverboat barges onshore. Barbour also secured federal funding to rebuild and improve Mississippi’s section of the battered Gulf Coast. Notice I never mentioned their political affiliations. In


these circumstances, party doesn’t matter: results do. Strong corporate leadership also affects millions. At G2E, I


interviewed two wonderful CEOs for an upcoming feature. Despite different backgrounds, they offered similar advice. Penn National CEO/President Tim Wilmott will retire on December 31. Penn employs almost 19,000 employees nationwide. Incredible Technologies CEO/President and 2019 AGA Hall of Fame honoree Elaine Hodgson took her privately- owned company from a successful amusement manufacturer to a niche gaming company with 255 employees. Leadership is not automatic, but learned and developed.


Respect comes from achievement, not from just holding the job. To keep things moving forward, we must demand intelligence, integrity and vision from those making the rules for those of us who have to live by them.


NOVEMBER 2019 11


Christian Hinkle/Adobe Stock


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86