search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FUNDRAISING – Meet the funder


Phase 1 of the Bitterley Garden Project


‘We received £5,000 to build


OFF-GRID FUNDING


The Calor Rural Community Fund supports inspiring community projects in areas not connected to the mains gas grid


S


ince launching its fund in 2017, gas company Calor has supported 73 community projects that have helped


improved people’s lives in rural areas across the UK. Last year, Calor gave away its biggest fund yet – a total of £85,000 – in honour of its 85th anniversary.


How does it work? As long as your community project


is off the mains gas network and in need of financial support, you’re eligible to apply for funding in one of the three categories – £1,000, £2,500 or £5,000. Successful applications are published on Calor’s website, where the public can show their support through likes, shares and donations. Finalists in each


category are then determined by a points system and the winners are chosen by a panel of judges.


Crowdfunder


partnership Each eligible project is given help with setting up a crowdfunding page through Calor’s partnership with Crowdfunder. Practical advice, support and free guides help make crowdfunding less of a daunting prospect. Once understood, crowdfunding can become part of a community’s online fundraising skillset in the longer term. Supporters are encouraged to


interact with the crowdfunding page – in 2020, likes and shares were worth one point, while monetary donations raised 10 points. The more people


an outdoor classroom’ ‘Our school has a lovely outdoor space that was falling into disrepair and in need of investment to realise its full potential, so we created the Bitterley Garden Project. We split our project into three parts: Phase 1 was to clear the site, put in new growing beds and refresh the bark pathways – we achieved this early in 2020. Phase 2 is to build a new outdoor classroom to provide an engaging setting for outdoor learning. We were thrilled to be selected as one of the £5,000 winners of the Calor Fund, enabling us to begin work on this. On top of the Calor Fund, we raised an additional £2,873 through donations from the crowdfunding page, which will enable us to implement Phase 3. This involves creating a wild zone area, installing an outdoor kitchen and hand-washing station, and repairing our clay pizza oven.’ Rachel Whiteman, PTA chair, Bitterley CofE Primary School, Ludlow, Shropshire (130 pupils)


interact with a page, the higher the project’s engagement score. Projects with the highest scores in each category become finalists, all of whom receive some form of funding. Although crowdfunding is not


obligatory when applying for the grant, it does improve a project’s chances of success and will also contribute additional funds. Even if your project doesn’t win a grant, it will still be a step further towards its goal. Last year, an extra £234,000 was raised by the crowd in addition to the £85,000 grant fund. Gift Aid can be claimed on community donations to increase funding further.


The finalists In 2020, 42 finalists were shortlisted,


and the judging panel chose 22 winners based on four factors: impact, sustainability, submission and originality. Those who didn’t win each received £500 towards their project in addition to their crowdfunded donations.


l Find out more, and register your interest for the 2021 fund at: communityfund.calor.co.uk/


pta.co.uk SPRING 2021 43


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60