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WATER PAGES


TheUAE has the highest ecological footprint theworld


amount ofwater supplied to households increased by 75%.


• Their total combinedwater usage figure is 1,439m3 per capita per year; a lower total compared to Canada due to Armenia’s lower green and greywater consumption.


NewZealand (pop. 3906) – 26.1m3


While concern for the environment has meant consumers strive to adoptwater saving habits,water usage is high, typically due to demand in agriculture, hydro- electricity and tourism..


Thanks to lowfigures for green, blue and grey water across industrial, domestic and agriculture, NewZealand’s totalwater consumption is 1,589m3 per capita per year.


USA (pop. 288958) – 22.6m3


• Domestic consumption in the United States may be attributed to easy access to safe, treatedwater across the country.While consumption rates are high, public domestic water use has declined since 1995, partly due to infrastructure improvements, better detection of leaks and consumers beingmore aware of the problems caused bywater wastage.


22


• The USA has a totalwater consumption amount of 2,842m3 per capita, per yearwith its green water consumption being the highest of the countries in this top 7.


Costa Rica (pop. 3963) – 19.9m3


• Costa Rica has a good track record of environmental conservation, howeverwith cleanwater being guaranteed for all households, it does allowwater to bemore easily used.


• Costa Rica’s totalwater consumption is 1,490m3, owing to lowbluewater figures, and comparatively lower greywater figures when compared to the US and Canada.


Panama (pop. 2979) - 18.5m3


• Panama is the biggest consumer ofwater in Latin America. As both its population and economy steadily grows, the country is likely to face further demand for newwater sources. Householdwater usage is also encouraged due to the lowcost ofwater in the country. A significantly lowtotal blue water consumption amount sees Panama’s total figures being the lowest of this group of 7, at 1,364m3 .


| February 2021 | www.draintraderltd.com


United Arab Emirates (pop. 3330) – 18.5m3


• The UAE has the highest ecological footprint theworld,withwater consumption growing significantly since 1960 (both due to population growth and high household water use).With the country’swater desalination plants burning copious amounts of fossil fuels, its demand forwater is also adding to its carbon footprint.


• The UAE has one of the highest totalwater consumptions across agriculture, domestic and industry at 3.136m3, scoring highest for all three types ofwater usage compared to all 7 countries in this list.


Savingmoney through efficientwater consumption


Aswell as environmental benefits, there’s a significant financial benefit to savingwater. For example, let’s look at the top 5 countries in theworldwith the highest domesticwater consumption. The countries’ residents could save an average of $317 in a single use of their appliances by following thewater savings tips listed above. In contrast, ignoring water savingmeasures could see them spending an average of $1326 across all appliances.


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