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a name and the death sentence passed by the British military tribunal. Each figure is pierced with a different pattern of holes, representing the bullet holes of the firing squad.


Gillespie has sculptures all over Ireland and in Europe, the US and Canada.


Famine Subject


This is a memorial to the victims of the Irish Famine who had to emigrate from the Dublin quays (Fig. 7.27).


Composition


The figure group is strung out along the quay. Each seems isolated in their own misery. A man carries a limp child, while others carry small parcels of their possessions. A skinny dog follows.


Style


The figures are basically realistic, but their features and anatomy have been exaggerated for dramatic effect.


Technique and materials The figures are cast in bronze by the lost wax method. The finish is rough – the bronze was not cleaned or polished after it came out of the mould. This crude treatment adds to the ragged and starved look of the people on their way to the ship that will hopefully take them to a new life.


Changes in the arts in the 19th and 20th centuries


During the 19th century, the arts became more important in society. There was a higher level of education and a growing middle class who wanted original art to decorate their homes.


Many of our national collections were started at this time. The National Gallery and the National Museum were both built in the 19th century.


Schools of art were set up in the main cities. Young Irish artists got a grounding there and then


Fig. 7.27


Famine, 1997, by Rowan Gillespie, bronze scultpure, Custom House Quay, Dublin


CHAPTER 7: IRISH ART IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES


145


ART IN IRELAND


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