search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
He studied languages at Trinity College Dublin and worked as a teacher for 20 years while he made sculptures in his free time.


He attended night classes in the National College of Art and spent nine months studying in Chelsea Polytechnic under Henry Moore in 1947–8.


Much of his early work was woodcarving and he was receiving church commissions from 1949 for his figures, which showed genuine religious feeling.


He was involved in the Irish Exhibition of Living Art and the Royal Hibernian Academy and he exhibited frequently.


Fig. 7.21 Mid-Summer Window with Moths, 1992, by Tony O’Malley, oil on board, 125.8cm x 125.8cm, Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane


overlook the essentially abstract nature of the work.


Colour


Natural greens and browns are decorated with small areas of bright yellows and reds.


Technique and materials O’Malley sometimes applied textures and scratches to the surface of his work. In this painting, brushwork and surface marks create a sense of movement and depth.


Twentieth-century sculpture


Figurative sculptors


Oisín Kelly (1915–81) The son of a teacher in Dublin’s inner city, Kelly was christened Austin but used the name Oisín.


In 1964 he became artist-in-residence at the Kilkenny Design Workshop and produced designs for fabrics, ceramics and metalwork. This was the beginning of his full-time art career.


The Children of Lir (Fig. 7.22) was the first of a number of public sculptures that he was commissioned to do. The Working Men that stand outside City Hall in Cork, the James Larkin figure on O’Connell Street in Dublin, the Roger Casement figure at Ballyheigue in Co. Kerry and the Chariot of Life group outside the Irish Life Centre in Dublin are just a few of the large sculptures he made.


Kelly also made smaller pieces for private sale and exhibition. He made dancers, animals and more abstract work. The Marchers (Fig. 7.23) is an example of his smaller work, which leans towards abstraction.


Bronze was not the only medium Kelly worked in. He also carved stone and wood and did work in cast iron, steel and cement. He always worked in sympathy with his materials.


The Children of Lir


Subject This bronze sculpture (Fig. 7.22) is a memorial to the freedom fighters of 1916. It takes the form


CHAPTER 7: IRISH ART IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES 141


ART IN IRELAND


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93