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Fig. 13 (left) The Kiss, 1889, by Auguste Rodin, Musée Rodin, Paris. This work shows Rodin’s unique ability to express intense emotion through the medium of sculpture.


Fig. 14 (centre) David, 1501, by Michelangelo, Galleria dell’Accademia, Florence. Michelangelo was only 26 years old when he carved the statue of David. The Renaissance sculpture is 4.2 metres high and depicts the biblical hero David, represented as a standing male nude. Originally commissioned for one of the niches in the Cathedral of Florence, it was carved from a single block of marble.


Fig. 15 (right) Cantoria (detail), 1431–8, by Luca della Robbia, marble relief for the Cathedral of Santa Maria dell Fiore, Florence. This is an organ loft, called a cantoria. Ten low relief panels are set in two rows. They depict boys and girls and little putti (winged cherubs or cupids) singing in harmony, playing instruments and dancing. To show perspective, the artist carved the foreground figures well out from the background and barely raised those behind.


Traditional sculpture Form


In the past there were only two forms of sculpture:


* Sculpture in the round, also called freestanding (Fig. 14)


* Relief sculpture, which remained attached to a solid background (Fig. 15)


Techniques Sculptors used only three main techniques: Characteristics


The following were the main characteristics of sculpture:


* It was the only three-dimensional art form.


* It was representational (it was about something).


* It was an art of solid form. Empty spaces did not have a role in and of themselves.


* It had no moving parts. INTRODUCTION xvii


* Carving * Modelling * Casting


INTRODUCTION

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