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Fig. 7.22


(left) The Children of Lir, 1966, by Oisín Kelly, bronze sculpture, Garden of Remembrance, Dublin


Fig. 7.23 (above) The Marchers, 1969, by Oisín Kelly, cast aluminium, 18cm x 78cm x 7cm, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin.


of four children and four swans. It may refer to the fall of the old regime and the new state rising from it.


Composition


The four children spiral down in increasing degrees of collapse into the pool that the sculpture stands in. The swans rise from within the figure group, moving upward in a tighter spiral. One needs to walk around the sculpture to appreciate the complicated interplay of shapes and forms and the sense of movement that is achieved.


Style


Most of Kelly’s work is figurative, but not realistic. Forms are simplified and movement is often suggested.


Technique and materials


This is a large sculpture cast in copper and bronze. The original work would have been modelled in clay and scaled up to the final size.


Modern approaches to sculpture


Alice Maher (1956–)


Born in Co. Tipperary, Maher graduated from the University of Limerick and the Crawford School of Art in Cork. She did an MA in Fine Art at the University of Ulster in Belfast and was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to the San Francisco Art Institute in 1986. She represented Ireland at the São Paulo Biennial in 1994.


Maher combines painting, sculpture, photography, animation, digital media and installation in her practice, sometimes combining media in an unexpected way.


Part of Maher’s practice is conventional drawings. Sometimes long strands of hair are loosely interwoven, like in Andromeda (1999) or the drawings of an adolescent girl doing a series of tasks in The Thicket (1991).


The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, hosted an exhibition, Becoming, in 2013, which reviewed her work so far.


142 APPRECIATING ART: SECTION 1


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