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separate areas of red, and bright areas like hands and faces are set against areas of darker glass.


Style


Clarke’s style is described as Symbolist. One might compare it with the exotically robed figures of Gustav Klimt.


Technique and materials Fig. 7.16


The St Gobnait Window by Harry Clarke, a single stained glass lancet window, Honan Chapel, Cork


Clarke was a very talented craftsman. He used acids to thin coloured glass and create a range of subtle tones. His painting of details and shading was very skilful. He used leading as strong line to emphasise areas of the composition. See how he creates honeycomb patterns in Gobnait’s robes in this window (see the section on making stained glass on page 197).


Influences


Clarke saw an exhibition of international art in Dublin in 1905 and was impressed by the work of Aubrey Beardsley and the Pre-Raphaelites. He kept in touch with movements in art and craft through magazines and trips to London and Paris.


The Cubist influence


curve connects the faces of the nuns and thieves in the bottom section. The large patterned area of Gobnait’s robe is almost abstract. We need the face and hands to identify her figure.


Colour


Clarke was famous for his careful choice of colour. He went to London several times a year to get the coloured glass he needed for each project. He even had special coloured glass made for him. In this window the royal blue of Gobnait’s robe dominates, contrasted with the white veil she wears. Gem-like beads of red and blue form a screen behind the figures. He used green to


The movements in modern art that followed each other in quick succession in Europe in the early years of the 20th century went largely unnoticed in Ireland.


Evie Hone and Mainie Jellett met at art college in London and decided to go to Paris to learn what they could about the new styles of art that were developing there. They studied first with André Lhote and then with Albert Gleizes, and together they developed theories on Cubism.


They exhibited Cubist work in Dublin in 1923 and 1924, but the work was little understood. They went on to raise awareness of modern theories among the younger Irish artists.


CHAPTER 7: IRISH ART IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES 137


ART IN IRELAND


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