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experience and appreciation of works of art in a gallery or museum.’


Discuss this statement with reference to a named gallery or museum you have visited. Describe in detail two named works you found interesting and discuss how these works were displayed.


and


In your opinion, briefly outline two initiatives that would encourage young people to engage with works of art on display in museums or galleries.


Illustrate your answer. Introduction


The introduction to this question could begin with something quite straightforward like:


I visited the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin recently with my teacher and our art class. I had really hoped to be able to see a wide variety of art, but unfortunately the main building is closed for renovation. As it turned out, this made the visit more interesting and enjoyable because although we saw quite a small number of works, we looked at them in great detail. We were also not as tired because we didn’t have to walk through so many floors.


Main body


Our visit was concentrated in the Millennium Wing of the gallery. This bright, new, modern building won architectural awards when it was designed in 2002. The extension, which fronts onto Clare Street, was constructed in high-quality white concrete and adds a good deal of extra space to the gallery. It provided suites for the permanent collection and exhibitions, as well as a gallery shop and café.


The first thing I noticed was a most impressive long white staircase. This takes visitors to the galleries on the first floor, but it also creates an air of grandeur and expectation. Upstairs the rooms are divided between the European collection in part of the older building and the Irish collection in the new extension.


I was delighted to leave my coat and bag downstairs in the cloakroom and noted that one could also access the galleries by the lift.


Continue with a description of the layout of the works. Mention the rooms and the lighting, and describe how the work is displayed based on your own individual experience:


I found low lighting made the rooms very peaceful and created a special atmosphere. In fact, I entirely forgot that it was artificial light because it allowed me to look at the works in such detail.


The time passed quickly as I wandered from room to room. Sometimes I sat for a while in front of the paintings on the long leather seats with my friends to enjoy works by Irish artists such as William Orpen, Paul Henry, William Leech and Jack B. Yeats. The European works included Impressionism and Post- Impressionism by artists such as Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir and Vincent van Gogh, but for me, two paintings really stood out.


One of those was Ecce Homo by the Renaissance artist Titian from Venice. I found this image of a gentle Christ bound, tortured, beaten and crowned with thorns very moving. I was interested to learn that Titian painted it when he was almost 80.


The soft painterly textures and feathery brushstrokes bring this painting to life. The artist used transparent coloured glazes to create an almost translucent effect, and the bright yellow glow behind Jesus’ head places his face in shadow. The downcast eyes show his sorrow and torment, but the brightness of the halo suggests that while the human body is easily destroyed, the spirit cannot be reached so easily.


The essay should continue with a description of how the painting was displayed in the room itself, the space between other paintings, wall colour, etc.


Another example should be analysed in the same way.


INTRODUCTION


xxv


INTRODUCTION

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