search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
in the Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, won a gold medal when it was exhibited at the Aonach Tailteann art exhibition in 1924. The Geneva Window (1930), commissioned by the government for the International Labour Court in Geneva as a gift of the Irish state, was ultimately rejected because some of the subjects and images were considered to be too controversial. It is now in the Wolfsonian art museum in Miami, Florida, in the US.


Clarke suffered from ill health all his life and for the last few years was seriously ill with tuberculosis. In spite of this, he worked extremely hard. He produced 130 windows, several illustrated books, graphic designs, fabric designs and decoration schemes for the family church decorating business and was also involved in organising and judging exhibitions.


Clarke was the outstanding stained glass artist of his day.


The St Gobnait window Subject


Fig. 7.15 Walpurgis Night from Goethe’s Faust, 1924, by Harry Clarke, published by Haarp in 1925


Clarke’s style can be described as Symbolist, but it includes elements of Celtic art and Romanticism. His figures have a characteristic look: large eyes, long separated fingers and toes and elongated proportions.


Stained glass


His success in competitions led to the commission for nine windows for the Honan Chapel of Saint Finbarr at University College Cork, which he worked on between 1915 and 1918. An Túr Gloine got the commission for the other eight windows. A bequest from the Honan family allowed the church to be built to the highest standards in the Celtic Revival style.


Clarke designed some secular windows as well as church windows. The Eve of St Agnes window, now


136 APPRECIATING ART: SECTION 1


The subject is St Gobnait, the patron saint of beekeepers (Fig. 7.16). She had a church on Inisheer in the Aran Islands in Co. Galway (where Clarke spent many summer holidays and sketching trips with family and friends). Scenes at the top and bottom of the window show the saint and her companions driving off thieves who came to rob her church. The main panel shows St Gobnait in profile, with a church in her left hand and a staff in her right. Thieves cower behind her robes and bees surround her.


Composition


Our attention is drawn to the pale profile of Gobnait, with her flowing red hair outlined by a dark halo with a green cross that echoes the semi-circular curve of the arch of the window. In the arch, another curve of bright stars and crosses surrounds the nuns in the top left. Yet another


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93