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SECTOR FOCUS: ADDITIVES FOR ENGINES


Precise performance: Additive chemistry for existing and future engine hardware


Dave Wilson, Alex Jones and Adrian Fitzpatrick, Lubrizol Additives


As the industry continues its relentless drive toward a low emissions future, significant innovation continues to occur in the internal combustion engine (ICE). Innovations are being enabled by more sophisticated engine lubricants that are a critical design element in the development of future hardware.


Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) engine and aftertreatment hardware strategies differ, often resulting in the need for tailored lubricant technology solutions. Toyota’s “dynamic force engine” for instance is designed to improve the useful energy that results from combusting fuel. This creates hotter combustion temperatures and requires lubricant technologies that are high in thermal stability to deliver ongoing engine protection.


In contrast, lower internal operating temperatures in hybrid engines mean that excess fuel and water vapour can accumulate in the absence of extra heat, which in principal could lead to degradation of the lubricant and corrosion within the engine. These conditions mean that engine oil formulations could require additional elements to add protection in the future. In each case, correct and precisely formulated lubricant technology is required to optimise the technical and performance benefits sought by the OEM.


10 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.157 JUNE 2020


Today’s highest performance lubricants are a complex formulation of additive, performance polymer, pour point depressant and high-quality base oil, created for the specific requirements of the hardware design. The benefits they can offer are applicable equally to future as well as existing engine hardware and after-treatment systems.


As well as enabling hardware and after-treatment innovations, higher performance lubricants directly deliver efficiency improvements using lower viscosity grades and lower high-temperature/high-shear (HTHS) rate viscosity.


HTHS viscosity is regarded as the viscosity grade classification that best predicts fuel efficiency and more accurately mimics the engine lubricant behaviour in increasingly severe operating conditions; notably in the camshaft bearings as well as the piston rings and liners.


A move to lower high-temperature/high-shear viscosity engine lubricants results in the additive package and performance polymer having an even more significant role to play. This is because the durability protection in lower HTHS lubricants can be reduced and the additive technology needs to


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