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UKLA President’s Report


I am writing this soon after the UKLA dinner on 7th November, which was a very good evening and a successful event, with the usual very positive “buzz” around the room.


My thanks to the UKLA Secretariat for making it such a success, and it was great to have the insights from the excellent John Sergeant in his speech, especially his take on the likely parliamentary outcome of any Brexit deal.


The theme in my speech was on the major transformations taking place in our industry, and the importance of the UKLA association and its members staying engaged with policy makers in the UK and Europe, to make the case for all the positive benefits we continue to bring to the environment and society, and to try to ensure that policies and regulations are based on sound footings.


This is unglamorous but essential work. And I think all of us as members have an important part to play


in this (along with the UKLA) through our local contacts and also particularly in how we all position what we do in our marketing efforts and in particular in our social media activities, to stress the contributions we make to fuel economy and other energy savings, where the potential environmental benefits and savings we bring to society are enormous.


I quoted the research that suggests that approximately 30% of all energy is wasted through friction, heat, wear and corrosion. And whilst we already contribute substantially to fuel and energy savings, I challenged those present to think what even a 1% or 2% further improvement in fuel efficiency from lubricants could contribute with 1 or 2 billion cars on the world’s roads.


Let’s make the case for our industry, not just in the UK, but across Europe and the globe!


David Hopkinson, UKLA President


UEIL President’s Report


In October the European lubricants industry gathered in Budapest for UEIL’s much-anticipated Annual Congress.


Our vision was to discuss the key challenges under the theme “The lubricant industry: embracing the future”, in a more interactive fashion. The format relied on participants actively engaging in the discussions. The Congress had the highest ever engagement from delegates. I found it both valuable and inspiring to hear so many knowledgeable people exchange their views on the different topics addressed.


At the event we heard about issues that are shaping our future; access to talent, digitalisation, sustainability, and e-mobility. To embrace the future we must move forward as an industry if we are to remain competitive. This is not easy, but I am confident that by exchanging views and perspectives, we will succeed.


The Congress was truly international, bringing together experts from Asia, Middle East and the US


4 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.148 DECEMBER 2018


who enlightened us on the challenges and opportunities the lubricants industry faces in other parts of the world.


I cannot emphasise enough the importance of taking a global approach when thinking about challenges and opportunities.


I would encourage similar discussions in future.


Next year the Congress will take place in Cannes, France, from 23 to 25 October. We are already working at full speed to ensure we continue to maximise value for participants. We hope to see many of you there!


In the meantime, we are still a few weeks away from the Christmas break, so, with minds already turning to 2019, I wish you all a successful end to 2018.


Best wishes, Valentina Serra-Holm, UEIL President


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