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ANALYSIS Particulates matter Fuel borne catalyst (FBC) can help OEMs to meet tightening emissions regulations in India Amy Challinor, Infineum


Growing vehicle numbers and rising air pollution have spurred India to introduce Bharat VI emissions limits nationwide on April 1 2020. With much tighter restrictions on particulates and NOx compared to the current Bharat IV legislation, Insight explores the challenges this jump presents in terms of aftertreatment system strategy.


India’s population topped the billion-mark back in 1998 and has continued on a steady upward trajectory. Today, it is in second place, behind China, on the leaderboard of the largest countries by population. This growth, combined with increased urbanisation and improved individual wealth, has fuelled demand for personal mobility. And, although two-wheeled vehicles still hold some 80% of the domestic market, passenger car sales are growing.


India domestic sales trends


In 2017, sales of passenger cars rose the fastest in four years, reaching in excess of three million, with the strongest growth in the sports utility segment. It is estimated that there are already more than 230 million vehicles on India’s roads, and sales forecasts remain strong for the future. This might be good news for the world’s automakers, but is less welcome in terms of pollution and congestion in the densely populated cities. World Health Organization (WHO) data shows that, when looking at the small particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less in diameter, known as PM 2.5, 14 of the world’s 20 most polluted cities are in India.


Tougher emissions regulations from 2020 This situation has prompted the Indian Government to introduce tougher emissions regulations. The current Bharat Stage (BS) IV limits (equivalent to Euro 4), which were introduced nationwide in 2017, will be replaced by BS-VI (equivalent to Euro 6) for all new vehicles nationwide from April 1 2020. Their action completely leapfrogs the previously proposed BS-V, and dramatically reduces permissible levels of a number of pollutants including PM 2.5 and NOx. In view of the serious pollution levels that have been recorded in New Delhi, the introduction of BS-VI fuels in the National Capital Region, an area surrounding the capital city, was advanced to April 2018 – two years ahead of the deadline.


14 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.148 DECEMBER 2018


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