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TECHNICAL


Polyglycol for Compressor Lubricants


Henrik Heinemann, Technical Service Manager Compounded Lubes , BASF


The market for compressor lubricants is wide and varied. From industrial, through food processing and plastics manufacturing; to exploration, transport, refining and storage in the upstream oil and gas sectors.


Over time the use of Polyalphaolefin (PAO) and Polyalkalineglycol (PAG) has become more widespread in response to end user demands for improved performance displacing traditional mineral oils in the industrial air compressor sector for example where PAO and PAG account for over 75% of the lubricants market.


20 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.148 DECEMBER 2018


In the Oil & Gas compressor market where these types of lubricants provide longer fluid life and greater energy efficiency PAG, Esters and synthetic blends account for 50% of the total market although mineral oils also continue to prove to be popular.


The advantages of these type of synthetic base oil are that they provide improved energy efficiency leading to increased equipment durability, which in turn allows for extended service intervals alongside benefits you would associate with synthetic technology including improved temperature profile, increased thermal stability, cleaner operation/burn and overall lower cost in use.


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