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of scale help to ensure availability and reliable supply. This state-of-the-art plant allows SONGWON to supply products cost effectively all over the world to meet customers’ requirements and is ideally situated to support customers who are extending their blending activities into Asia.


the facility in South Korea. This allows production efficiency and scale _ and therefore economic value - to be still further enhanced.


SONGNOX® L570 is a liquid butylated / octylated


diphenylamine antioxidant that provides lubricating oils with excellent protection against thermo-oxidative degradation by reacting with and stabilizing free radicals. This highly versatile product is designed for demanding automotive and industrial lubricants and oils as well as specialty applications such as greases. Close cooperation with customers enables SONGWON to develop solutions for today and tomorrow, and the company is constantly expanding its range to meet new and ever more demanding market requirements.


Besides SONGWON’s industry-standard aminic (SONGNOX®


L670) and phenolic (SONGNOX®


L135)


antioxidants, the latest addition to its antioxidant range for fuels and lubricants, SONGNOX® L570, introduced in May this year, is also manufactured at


GEIR Update: Re-refining of waste oils


is the best eniviromental outcome (ifeu 2018)


The European Re-refining Industry Association, GEIR, has been supporting an update of the study on ecological and energetic assessment of re-refining waste oils to base oils. The initial study was performed by ifeu on behalf of the GEIR (Fehrenbach 2005), stakeholders and policymakers still refer to this study published more than ten years ago. Considering the current state of technology and key developments in the industry, the original set of data had to be regarded as outdated taking the actual state of technical practice into account.


In addition, stakeholders provided feedback regarding the complex language of the study and that it was difficult to read. Hence, ifeu updated the study with the aim to provide a forward-looking view on the environmental aspects of regeneration of waste oil and easy to read document. The main difference found in the updated study is that in 2005 direct use of waste oil as fuel in cement works, today, is replaced by the most relevant alternative option as treatment to fuel oil.


30 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.148 DECEMBER 2018


LINK www.songwon.com


Figure 1. Overview of the impac assessment results; all figures related to the particular results of “regeneration”, main bars: avarage res of the four techniques (normalised to one), deviation bars: range of the techniques (n. b.: scale not continuous).


The updated study concludes that: • The environmental advantages of the regeneration of waste oil to base oil hold true throughout all the applied impact categories versus processing base oils from crude oil


• A thorough benefit of regeneration can be observed when comparing to the most common alternative use in Europe, treatment to fuel.


The study has also undergone a critical review and all comments have been taken on board.


LINK www.geir-rerefining.org


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