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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE


CAPITAL GAINS The financial services sector is going strong for Wings Travel Management in London


THE SPECTRE AND UNCERTAINTY of Brexit has prompted several major financial institutions to move their assets and offices out of London’s Square Mile to other cities in Europe, such as Frankfurt and Dublin. But Wings Travel Management’s office in the capital hasn’t felt the pinch. More than 300 financial services sector clients – from hedge funds, private equity and asset management companies to spin-offs such as fintech firms – rely on Wings’ London office to manage their business travel seamlessly. “So far we haven’t seen any significant knock-on effect of Brexit in terms of our financial services sector clients, and we don’t foresee that changing in 2020,” says Richard Turpin, Director of Account Development and Consulting at Wings Travel Management. “In fact, over 80 per cent of these London- based clients have been with Wings for more than five years and indeed, we have one private investment firm which has been a client for 24 years.”


Wings attributes the longevity and loyalty of clients in the financial services sector to the TMC’s particular brand of high-touch personal service.


“It’s a dynamic sector and many of these clients are senior or C-suite travellers with complex requirements and high expectations,” says Richard Turpin. “They know what they want as many of them travel every week and any personal preferences that aren’t met can magnify into major


“WINGS IS OFTEN ABLE TO USE ITS OWN PRIVATE AIRFARES


AND PREFERRED HOTEL RATES TO DRIVE LARGE SAVINGS”


irritants. They want certain seats on the aircraft, will often change their ticketing arrangements while travelling, and will usually book at short notice, often within seven days of departure. They are normally working within tight time constraints, so all the little touches that we can build in, such as seamless ground arrangements and transfers, are important.” Itineraries are often complex and multi- sector; flights are usually in premium cabins and accommodation in four- and five-star hotels. Nevertheless, clients


wings .travel ■ info.uk@wings .travel


are looking to streamline costs wherever possible and Wings is often able to use its own private airfares and preferred hotel rates, driving large savings. In 2019, Wings saved one such client £252,000 on air spend. Servicing has traditionally been purely offline and clients weren’t interested in self-booking tools. However, that is starting to change. Wings recently implemented an online solution for a private investment firm to book European point-to-point flights. The Wings team still handles long-haul bookings offline, issue tickets, arrange hotel accommodation and organise visas. Wings is projecting savings of 58 per cent over the next 12 months if all short-haul flights are booked via the online tool. “We’ve built very strong relationships over many years with these companies. They know that they can rely on us for personal service, but they also appreciate that we are also looking at ways to maximise savings,” says Turpin.


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