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INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


New summit aims to address impact of climate change


ON 15 NOVEMBER, the Corporate Travel Climate Action Summit (CTCAS) will convene in London for the first time to address the impact of corporate travel on the environment. The summit comprises a voluntary group


of industry colleagues who have a personal and professional interest in making a positive collaborative difference in our sector. Speakers and attendees include individuals


from WWF, CDP, University of Cambridge AstraZeneca, Barclays, Enterprise, Microsoft, Unilever, Amex GBT, Festive Road and Diners Club. If you’re a travel buyer, or a supplier with an interest in the link between business travel and the environment, and would like to attend, contact helen.hodgkinson@barclaycard.co.uk. Applications to attend will be appraised to ensure a balanced representation at the event.


BUSINESS TRAVEL DEMAND HIT BY VOLATILE POUND


RESEARCH HAS REVEALED one-third of UK employees are travelling less for work because of fluctuations in the value of the pound caused by Brexit uncertainty. A survey of 2,000 business travellers in the UK,


Germany, France and Spain by Homelike also found Brits are not the only ones impacted – many French and Spanish companies reported they had stopped travelling altogether. British companies also appear to be preparing for a


slowdown in European relations, with fewer employees travelling to the continent than before Brexit was announced. Germans are still travelling frequently, but 65 per cent said they have stopped going to the UK. However, the study revealed the impact of business


travel on local economies, with Europeans spending an estimated £91.45 billion per year in shops, cafes, restaurants, bars and gyms. Brits tend to spend the least at £356 per person per week on average, while the French splash out £561 per week.


HYATT PLANS TWO MANCHESTER HOTELS


HOTEL CHAIN HYATT IS TO open two hotels in Manchester, including the UK debut of its extended stay brand Hyatt House.


Hyatt Regency Manchester Oxford Road and Hyatt House Manchester Oxford Road will be located in the landmark “The Lume” building and both properties are expected to open in 2020.


The Hyatt Regency will feature 212 rooms plus a restaurant, bar, club lounge, fitness centre and seven meeting rooms. Meanwhile, Hyatt House will offer 116 “apartment-style” rooms.


The move will help to increase the number of Hyatt-branded hotels in the UK up to 11 by 2022.


Competition in Manchester’s extended-stay hotel market is set to further hot up with Marriott’s announcement that it will be bringing its Residence Inn brand to the city next year.


30 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019 buyingbusinesstravel.com


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