search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
WESTMINSTER WATCH


WORDS GARETH MORGAN


PREPARE FOR A RADICAL PLAN


If Labour gets into government, its policy on climate change will take chunks out of the travel industry


O


NE OF THE EFFECTS OF BREXIT has been sucking the oxygen from other issues. Government and Parliament is caught in its mire, the media is absorbed in it and Westminster


Twitter obsesses over the hour-by-hour drama. Indeed, part of the narrative of the day is that we need to “get it done” so we can focus on things that matter. But there is a strand of radical policy- making that isn’t waiting for Brexit to finish. It is pushing on regardless and, I think, is going largely unnoticed. That policy area is climate change. Extinction Rebellion has done its job of getting climate change on top of the news agenda through polarising direct action.


They frame the issue as existential and say that moving to a “net zero” carbon position by 2025 is absolutely necessary. The scale of change required to get to


that point in six years is massive. Severe restrictions on flying, radical changes to diet and huge increases in renewable energy (offshore wind covering an area twice the size of Wales). In short, seismic changes to the way we do things. The Government by contrast is talking net zero by 2050. ER activists dismiss this, but the UK is the first major economy in the world to make this a legal commitment. The Government maintains that the changes required to deliver this target are huge challenges in themselves. Now, how many people reading this know where Labour is on this scale? The only other viable governing party (at the minute!) is surely likely to be closer to the realism of the 2050 target than the heroic changes required to come in by 2025?


Nope. Labour is committed to net zero by 2030. This was decided on at the most recent Labour conference where it, not Brexit, was the biggest issue. Labour decides what to debate and vote on based on the number of “motions” it gets from local parties; the number referencing 2030 net zero dwarfed those of any other issue. It might be a long shot, but Labour could


be the Government at some point and it would be coming in with a commitment to radicalism on carbon reduction that would challenge many aspects of how we organise ourselves as a society. We need to start realising how radical climate policy is shifting from the fringes to the mainstream.


SHIELDED FROM REALITY Right now the transport sector is shielded from this reality. Despite the direct action, new targets, climate emergency declarations, flooding, fires, etc, we still have official policy backing airport expansion. That is because an effective alliance between business and trade unions uses its muscle in the two main parties to maintain this position. But how long can this endure? The travel sector needs to consider how


it can be radical in the face of this pressure, too, and whether reluctance to do so to avoid short-term discomfort will only store up genuine pain in the future as radical policy- making starts to take chunks out travel. What can our sector do to champion new


WE NEED TO START


REALISING HOW RADICAL CLIMATE POLICY IS SHIFTING FROM THE FRINGES TO THE MAINSTREAM


56 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019


aviation technology? What can we do to encourage sustainable fuel? What can we do to reward those airlines that have invested in newer, less polluting fleets? Are our offsetting schemes bold enough? There is a genuine pressure building for a more radical approach and we cannot rely forever on policy biting on every sector other than ours.


Gareth Morgan is a political lobbyist and director at Cavendish Communications.


He is also an advisor to the BTA, which represents travel management companies


buyingbusinesstravel.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120