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ADDITIVES | UV STABILISATION


Figure 1: Effect of UVITA SME 3811 plasmonic enhancer on transmittance of polypropylene homopolymer injection moulded plaques containing Maxgard 2800 UV absorber Source: Stabilization Technologies


“We have shown that current light stabiliser technologies have limitations with volatility, migration and blooming, compatibility, antago- nisms with condensation polymers and other additives in the system, and are generally expen- sive and fugitive over time having little perma- nence,” Webster says. “UVITA SME 3811 and its doped versions are not only cost-effective, but provide broader initial and post-protection to both coatings and plastics, while extending current light stabilisers by acting as spectral enhancers to boost the performance of both HALS and organic UV absorbers. Permanence in UV protection by UVITA SME and synergisms with organic light stabilisers, and initial hyperchro- mic increases in absorbance with Maxgard series UVA, makes for a cost-benefit performance in any plastic and coating formulation.” Webster says that in-situ conversion rates of


organic UV absorbers are slowed down by the presence of UVITA SME. He adds that studies with hydroxyl substituted benzophenones and benzo- triazoles show significant reductions of in-situ transformation of the organic UVA. The company has also demonstrated synergisms of UVITA SME 3811 with Maxgard organic UV absorbers and the new Maxgard 2000 series from Lycus Chemicals. “These alternatives are designed for many of the


Figure 2: Effect or spectral enhancer SB-2 on synergism with conventional organic UVA M-700 in clarified random PP copolymer Source: Stabilization Technologies


plasmonics usually concentrate on the topic of surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles. However, in the case of UVITA SME, he says there is an electromagnetic transfer of excited electrons from the surface of the particle to form a plasmon cloud over the insulative particle. The transference of that energy to the conductive band of the organic UV absorbers is the cause of the hyperchromicity, he claims.


He adds that the material can be used to


produce a broad UV absorber having no migration, no volatility and that is highly synergistic with current light stabiliser technology used globally.


68 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017


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REACH ECHA-targeted hydroxy-substituted benzotriazoles, which are reported to be bio-toxic and bio-accumulative in the environment. These synergisms have extended the global market window of opportunity beyond 380nm, into the visible and infrared regions,” he says. “For those designing a new cap stock for plastic compounds or artificial wood, the ability to have long-term permanence under any outdoor environmental conditions is a plus.” Webster says the technology makes the devel- opment of new packaging materials that require greater absorbance at wavelengths in the 410-440 nm region (to control rancidity) possible without pigments. He says there are agricultural and military applications to produce a material that absorbs from 200-800nm in the actinic to visible regions to near-infrared mid-thermic region of the infrared and also far-infrared region of the electro- magnetic region.


“New end-use applications are emerging as we understand the full implications of this technology better,” he claims.


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