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NEWS


BASF and Borealis to exhibit at Compounding World Expo


BASF and Borealis are among the latest companies to book stands at the Compounding World Expo, which will take place at Messe Essen in Germany on 27-28 June 2018. More than 70% of stands have already been taken at the exhibition, organised by AMI and Compounding World magazine. “We are delighted that BASF and


Borealis have joined our fast-growing list of Compounding World Expo exhibitors,” said Matt Wherlock, AMI’s exhibition sales manager. “Visitors to the event will be guaranteed to meet


an impressive array of world-leading suppliers of polymers, additives, compounds, machinery, equipment and related services,” he added. Companies that have already


booked stands include Azo, Biester- feld, Brabender, Buss, Campine, Coperion, Dow Corning, Econ, Elix, Farrel Pomini, Fraunhofer, HPF, ICMA San Giorgio, Imerys, IMI Fabi, JSW, Kaneka, KraussMaffei Berstorff, Leistritz, Maag, Mitsui, Mixaco, Mondo Minerals, MPI Chemie, Omya, Polyplas- tic Compounds, Reverté, Schenck,


Solvay, Unipetrol, Velox, Vertellus, Zeppelin and many more. Admission to the Compounding


World Expo and its conferences and seminars will be free of charge. Exhibition packages start at €2,700 shell-scheme space plus


for a 9 m2


unlimited exhibitor passes and extensive marketing support. For details, contact Matt Wherlock at matthew.wherlock@ami.international or on +44 117 314 8122. Alternatively, visit the website at: � www.compoundingworldexpo.com


Addivant boosts Ultranox capacity


Addivant has expanded production capacity for its high-performance phos- phite antioxidant Ultranox 626 by over 40% at its plant in Morgantown, West Virginia. The amount invested was not disclosed. Ultranox 626 is used in polyolefins, elastomers and engineering plastics at lower


concentrations than tradi- tional phosphite antioxi- dants, because of its higher phosphorus concentration. This, the company said, helps create low migration and low volatile-content plastics, which are important in the packaged food and automotive markets.


Addivant is also pursuing


the extension of global food contact approvals for Ultranox 626, allowing for broader use in food packaging. The move follows an


earlier three-fold expansion of capacity for its Weston 705 food-contact antioxi- dant for PE and elastomers. � www.addivant.com


New additives to boost crop yields


Interface Polymers, a spin-out from the UK’s University of Warwick, has developed a new range of anti-drip additives it claims will “improve the performance and longevity of agricultural films, transforming their cost-effectiveness in a wide range of applications”. The Polarfin additives, which are produced at


Interface Polymers CSO Christopher Kay 14


sites at Coventry and Loughborough in the UK, are based on a block copolymer additive technol- ogy that modifies the surface chemistry of the film. CSO Christopher Kay said: “Our additive becomes entangled with the film material because it is very similar in nature. This means that rather than migrating, our molecules are retained over time.” � www.interfacepolymers.com


COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017


Sensitive move by Clariant


Clariant is targeting the sensitive beverages market with the launch of its Senseaction range of colour masterbatches. Designed for produc-


tion of caps and closures in applications such as bottled water packaging, the new products are available in a wide range of colours and are spe- cially formulated, pro- cessed, tested and certified to be free of taste and odour effects, the company said. They are manufactured using a dedicated process line. The Senseaction range is designed to address the small risk that the pig- ments used to colour HDPE or PP caps and closures could contain trace elements. � www.clariant.com


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: INTERFACE POLYMERS


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