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MACHINERY | LABORATORY COMPOUNDERS


Right: A Coperion ZSK 18 MEGAlab system with gravimetric twin screw feeder, cooling belt strand pelletising system


separate heating and cooling zones, with only minimum heat ex- change between the neighbouring zones. The high torque of 20 Nm ensures a stable operation in various process conditions.


Turnkey lab solutions Coperion says it is providing an increasing number of laboratory scale turnkey systems, including raw material handling units through to feeding, extrusion, cooling and pelletising of the final product. “All sub-processes are optimally com- bined into the overall process,” the company says. All key components for the main process steps are developed and produced in-house. The company says the Coperion K-Tron KT20 loss-in-weight twin screw feeder is ideal for feeding powders at rates as low as 0.1 dm3


/h, which makes


it ia good choice for use in laboratory scale systems. The modular design makes it easy to configure the ideal feeding system for each application while auxiliary components such as ActiFlow and Electronic Pressure Compensation ensure ideal accuracy in most environments. Designed with micro-ingredients in mind,


Below: JSW has a TEX25αIII laboratory extruder in its newly


commissioned European TEXenter


Coperion K-Tron’s 12 and 16 mm Micro Screw Feeders are designed to provide maximum accu- racy at minimal feed rates. Novel design features ensure that high value ingredients are fed accurately at rates as low as 32 g/h with minimal residual material left in the feeder. The modular design means more flexibility for the process and easy access to all parts for cleaning and maintenance. The Coperion ZSK MEGAlab 18mm twin screw


extruder was developed especially for processing of smallest batch sizes – batches of 200g to a maximum of 40 kg/h are possible. This unit is said


to allow reliable scale-up to larger ZSK twin screw extruders. The process section of the ZSK MEGAlab twin screw extruder is designed as a modular system while the screw depth of 3.2 mm allows processing of standard pellets. With the SP 50, Coperion Pelletizing Technology


offers the optimal strand pelletiser for complete lab scale solutions. It offers a working width of 50 mm and allows throughput rates of 1-140 kg/h. Highlights include a cantilevered bearing design for easy access and cleanout, high cutting gap durability, vibration insulation, and numerous options such as pellet length regulation, communi- cation with the ZSK, and various drive power levels and speed ranges. Coperion’s ZSK 26 Mc18


26mm unit offers a


solution for production of larger lab samples or, with output rates of up to 180kg/hr, for small scale production. Germany-based masterbatch and custom compound producer Delta Kunststoffe added a ZSK 26 Mc18


to its compounding equip-


ment list in 2016. The company says the machine is intended to help it to operate more flexibly and efficiently, particularly when producing small to medium batch sizes.


Centred on technology JSW recently opened a ‘TEXenter’ technical centre in Düsseldorf, Germany, not far from its European headquarters. It is equipped with various technolo- gies for R&D on extrusion processes, compound- ing, chemical reaction, dewatering, devolatilising, pelletising, and other processes. The company’s latest TEX44αIII twin-screw extruder, which has a 47mm screw diameter and the world’s highest torque density of 18.2 N/cm³, is available for high-end compound trials. JSW says the very high torque makes it possible to operate the extruder with lower screw speeds and, as a result, lower polymer temperature so better product quality can be realised. In addition, a specialised TEX30α (32 mm screw


24 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017 www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: COPERION


PHOTO: JSW


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