This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ADDITIVES | FLAME RETARDANTS


according to ISO 5659-2 have shown significantly lower smoke opacity and smoke toxicity for a PP formulation containing ADK Stab FP-2500S com- pared to a traditional halogenated FR solution based on bis(pentabromophenyl)ethane (BPBPE) (Figure 2). This has also been recently verified by UL and resulted in a UL Verification certificate issued to the ADK Stab FP-2000 series. Smoke density reduction and a significantly


Above: Glow wire testing underway at FR producer Lanxess, which is acquiring Solvay’s phosphorous chemicals operations Image: Lanxess


acquisition of Chemtura in April, it has significantly broadened its portfolio of both organic phosphoric acid esters and brominated flame retardants. Disflamoll and Reofos phosphates are used as flame retardants and plasticisers in PVC, PUR, TPU, and synthetic rubber as well as processing aids and flame retardants in cellulose esters. BFRs from Lanxess are used in a broad range of different polymers including polyolefins, HIPS, ABS, PC, engineering thermoplastics like PA and PBT, PU, EPS and XPS for different end applications.


Phosphorous acquisition More recently, Lanxess has said that it plans to acquire the phosphorus chemicals business from Solvay, including it US production site. The transac- tion is projected to conclude in the first half of 2018, subject to customary regulatory approvals. “With this acquisition, we are benefiting from a North American platform for phosphorus-based specialty chemicals – a key component of our additive business – and are able to further drive our growth in this key region,” says Anno Borkowsky, General Manager of the Additives business unit at Lanxess. Adeka of Japan has been developing intumes- cent flame retardant systems for several years now. These systems differentiate by their stand-out reduction in smoke density and CO emissions compared to more traditional systems such as BFRs. Tests performed at an independent test institute


reduced emission of toxic gases make Adeka’s product range of intumescent FRs particularly interesting for transportation applications, includ- ing railway cars and equipment, but also has its merits in selected building and construction applications, such as stadium seating. For example, ADK Stab FP-2500S has been approved and selected for new seating for the stadiums hosting the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan. Paxymer continues to develop and launch


tailored synergistic products for combination with phosphorous/nitrogen (P/N) and mineral based systems to boost their fire performance, says Managing Director Amit Paul. “The company is working to extend its patent portfolio with the exist- ing patented technology as a base,” he says. “There are new patents pending that further widen the potential use of the novel approach. The launch of synergistic products targeted for the compounding market last year has led to a high influx of projects. “The main interests of compounders are to


decrease formulation cost, formulation complexity and to be able to meet mechanical requirements as well as the fire standards. We have developed a technology that allows for all of that,” he says. The company is focusing on developing and


marketing formulations designed for specific additives and additive blends. Formulations are tailored to specific P/N systems with typical addition levels of 1-7%. Addition of Paxymer will allow formulators to reduce the amount of FR additive by as much as 30%. Cost savings range up to 20% when combining Paxymer with P/N systems, Paul says. The company’s next target is to launch products


such as APP and mineral systems designed for boosting the efficiency of the commodity systems.


Figure 2: ISO 5659-2 smoke density and toxicity results for a PP formulation containing ADK Stab FP- 2500S compared to a traditional halogenated BFR system based on bis(pentabromophenyl)ethane


Smoke Opacity DS


Reference, no FR


ADK STAB FP-2500S BPBPE/Sb2


O3 Source: Adeka 36 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017


max 727 99


792


VOF4 (min)


1,121 55


2,783 CITG ***


0.07 0.03 0.37


CO2


(mg/m3 34,842 5,336 14,821


)


Smoke Toxicity at 8 min CO


HBr


(mg/m3 601 373


5,114 )


(mg/m3 NQ NQ 26


) NO2


(mg/m3 NQ NQ 10


) SO2


(mg/m3 NQ NQ 30


) �


NQ: Not quantifiable– www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: LANXESS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78