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UV STABILISATION | ADDITIVES


US-firm Stabilization Technologies claims its plasmonic UV absorbers offer a new and more sustainable option in terms of UV protection. Mark Holmes finds out more


Plasmonic protection from UV


A new technology area in UV stabilisation is claimed to be plasmonic UV absorbers and spectra enhanc- ers - a category of select sustainable green chemis- try materials that are said to deliver broad, perma- nently non-migrating, non-blooming UV protection while providing for long term absorbance. “Synergisms with HALS and conventional


hydroxyl substituted benzophenones and benzo- triazoles, and other plasmonic materials are now being discovered,” according to Dr Joe Webster, President of US-based Stabilization Technologies. “In addition, the materials provide mid-infrared and far-infrared absorbance and absorb broadly from the 200-800nm electromagnetic region of the spectrum. With changes in European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) regulations and bioactive chemi- cals in the environment, particularly those from hydroxyl substituted benzotriazoles, substitutes are needed. With the plasmonic enhancer UVITA SME 3811 and known synergisms with Maxgard 2700


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series UV absorbers from Lycus Chemicals, a range of substitutes is now commercially available for plastics and coatings,” he says. “UVITA SME plasmonic UV protection alone can stabilise plastics and coatings without hypsochro- mic or bathochromic shifts typically observed with organic ultraviolet absorbers. However, UVITA SME in combination with Maxgard 2700 series ultravio- let absorbers shows strong hyperchromic effects and bathochromic (red shifts). Instead, its presence produces a consistent hyperchromic shift with other UV light stabilisers.” Hypsochromic and bathochromic shift is defined as a change in the spectral band position in the absorption, reflectance, transmittance or emission spectrum of a molecule to a shorter or longer wavelength, respectively. Hyperchromicity is the increasing ability of a material to absorb light (the opposite is hypochromicity). Webster says discussions on the subject of


Main image: Plasmonic UV stabilisers could increase UV absorbance in films in the 410-440nm region without recourse to pigments


December 2017 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 67


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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