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ADDITIVES | FLAME RETARDANTS


Figure 3: Graph showing the synergistic effect of addition of DC 43-821 on heat release of a Al phosphinate flame retarded 30% glass reinforced PA6


Source: Dow Corning


Senior Technical Service & Development Engineer Dr Vincent Rerat began with the premise that with the increasing requirement for HFFR PA reinforced compounds used in E&E applications, metal phosphinate-based additives reach desired FR properties but used at high levels can impact mechanical properties and ageing performances


and they may also corrode processing tools. “Lower flow properties thus negatively affect processability and design freedom,” he said. At 1-2%, Dow Corning 43-821 acts as a synergist agent with Al phosphinate (AlP) to cut its loading by 40%, allowing restoration of desirable mechani- cal performances compared to the original P-based formulation (Figure 3). It also reduces corrosion, due to the lower phosphorus content in the formulation, and can achieve UL 94 V-0 levels of fire resistance. Total formulation cost can be cut by up to 10%, it is claimed. The Dow Corning 43-821 additive for PA compounds follows on from an earlier FR for polycarbonate, 41-001. Christophe Paulo, Plastic & Composites Global segment leader, says this enables V-0 performance at 1 mm in combination with synergists, with no effect on transparency. The company is now turning its attention to polyesters. According to Rio Tinto, the global market for


boron-based flame retardants also continues to expand. It says that through its US-based subsidiary US Borax (commonly known as Twenty Mule Team Borax), it remains the major global supplier of multifunctional zinc borates,


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