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ADDITIVES | FLAME RETARDANTS


Figure 6: Properties of LLDPE/EVA-based compounds containing various Apyral mineral-based flame retardant packages


65% Apyral 40CD


TS [MPa] before hot air aging


TS [MPa] after hot air aging (100 °C, 168 h) Elongation at break [%] before hot air aging


Elongation at break [%] after hot air aging (100 °C, 168 h) MVR [cm³/10 min] at 190 °C/21.6 kg LOI (%O2) Shore D


UL 94V [at 1.6 mm] Source: Nabaltec


14.7 14.8 141 117 3.6 42 58


Failed


of 4 wt% Apyral AOH EXL 500-17-C with 61 wt% Apyral 40CD aluminium hydroxide reached a UL 94 V-0 rating (at 1.6 mm) whereas the formulation containing only Apyral 40CD (65 wt%) failed to achieve a classification. Furthermore, the good mechanical properties of the compound can be maintained when both Apyral 40CD and Apyral AOH EXL 500-17-C are used (Figure 6). “Moreover, we found that the addition of Apyral AOH EXL 500-17-C optimises the compound’s performance in the hot air ageing test (100 °C, 168 h),” says Dr Corina Neumeister, R&D and Technical Service Manager, Cables & Polymers. “It is well known that synergists like nanoclays


very often impair the compound processability. Apyral AOH EXL 500-17-C enhances flame retar- dancy while not negatively affecting the process- ability,” says Neumeister. LKAB Minerals says it is continuing to develop its


UltraCarb range of natural flame retardant fillers. The latest addition to the range – Ultracarb LH3 – was specifically designed to be used in highly filled thermoplastic compounds. The company says that many natural fire-retardant fillers have poor colour consistency and inadequate control of the filler particle size distribution, a limitation that UltraCarb LH3 is claimed to overcome. It is made from LKAB’s own mineral deposits of hydromagnesite/huntite. LKAB recently commissioned an evaluation of


the environmental impact of UltraCarb (according to ISO 14040-14044), which found that greenhouse emissions and energy consumption is 40% - 45% lower than with aluminium hydroxide. “Since full production started in 2016, UltraCarb LH3 has seen strong year-on-year growth,” says Ian Yates, Busi- ness Development Manager for UltraCarb. “In the technically and commercially challenging market for halogen-free cable sheathing compounds, the


44 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017


61% Apyral and 4% 40CD Apyral AOH EXL 500-17-C


13.1 14.0 171 155 2.8 42 55


V-0 62% Apyral


40CD and 3% nanoclay


17.1 18.6 150 132 0.9 41 59


V-0


product has found a high level of acceptance.” In EPS and XPS polystyrene foams, HBCD


(hexabromocyclododecane) has been largely replaced as a flame retardant by polymeric FRs such as ICL’s FR-122P butadiene styrene bromi- nated copolymer. Lein Tange at ICL Europe says that, for both XPS and extruded EPS (xEPS) produc- tion, FR-122P must be introduced via a master- batch to ensure a homogenous, accurate and stable mixture. These masterbatches include thermal stabilisers to protect FR-122P from degradation. “ICL Industrial Products Brominated Epoxy F-2200 has been in use for years as such,” Tange says. “However, the use of the polymeric FR-122P in XPS applications required the introduction of a polymer- ic stabiliser to ensure a 100% polymeric master- batch. For this purpose, ICL developed an innovative brominated epoxy polymeric acid scavenger stabiliser. It exhibits improved stabilising properties and excellent synergy with FR-122P.” Samples are available for full scale production trials.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.pinfa.orgwww.clariant.comwww.budenheim.comwww.frxpolymers.comwww.icl-group.comwww.lanxess.comwww.adeka.co.jp/enwww.paxymer.sewww.dowcorning.comwww.borax.comwww.kyowa-chem.jp/enwww.martinswerk.comwww.nabaltec.dewww.lkabminerals.com


www.compoundingworld.com


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