This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ADDITIVES | FLAME RETARDANTS


Right: Flame retarded plastic undergoing a comparative tracking index (CTI) test at Clariant


thermal stability and enhanced electrical properties in the E&E sector, while low smoke density and toxicity are key demands in transportation-related applications. It says that, while halogenated FRs have limitations in fulfilling these requirements, its Exolit OP 1400 product, introduced around four years ago, has opened up new opportunities for halogen-free polyamide formulations. Exolit OP 1400 is claimed to provide a broader


processing window and can be used in part thicknesses of 0.4 mm and below. Typically, critical-to-quality (CTQ) parameters include higher relative thermal index (RTI), lower density, a comparative tracking index (CTI) of 600 V and above, and the highest hazard level designation for the European railway standard HL-3. For polyester formulations, Clariant recently


introduced Exolit OP 1248, based on an organic aluminium phosphinate, with an improved UL 94 V-0 performance. Main drivers and applications for new solutions in this area include miniaturisation, lighting, electric vehicles and photovoltaics. Also active in the PA compound market is Budenheim. It is launching two FRs for glass fibre reinforced polyamides 6 and 66, designated Budit 610 and Budit 611. “State of the art flame retard- ants for engineering plastics cause trouble due to corrosive behaviour during extrusion and injection moulding, which is a pain for processors,” says Dr Heiko Rochholz, Head of Marketing, Business Unit Material Ingredients. “We have solved that with the new grades.”


Below:


Budenheim’s new Budit 610 and 611 FRs are aimed at PA compounds for electrical applications


Electronic regulation Rochholz says that electronics manufacturers face increasing regulatory requirements for eco-friendly materials and processes, and are therefore opting for halogen-free flame retardants in polymers. Systems within the Budit 6 Series are halogen-free. They can be used at what Rochholz describes as “efficient” loadings, so have only a minor influence on mechanical and electrical properties, and they


also display very good non-corrosive processing properties. In addition, low leaching avoids unwant- ed migration to the surface during processing as well as under extreme weathering conditions. Budit 610/611 are based on melamine polyphosphate in a new synergistic combination for E&E applications. “Choosing Budit 610 or Budit 611 depends on the nature of PA 6/PA66 in use,” Rochholz says. The new products enable com- pounds to achieve a value of above 800°C in the glow wire ignition temperature test (GWIT) and to obtain a UL 94 V-0 rating at a loading of around 23 wt% (including the phosphinate). They do not lead to any discoloration of the polymer. FRX Polymers is another company trying to capitalise on the on-going trend away from halogenated flame retardants and low molecular weight types and toward HFFR and polymeric types. “As far as we know, FRX Polymers has the only halogen-free polymeric solution on the market,” says Marc Lebel, President and CEO. The company offers both polymeric and reactive phosphonates, branded Nofia, that are used in a variety of resins such as polyesters, polycarbonate, thermoplastic and thermoset polyurethanes, epoxies, unsaturated polyesters, and polyureas. FRX is already selling Nofia for textiles and fibres, mostly in PET. It is now also providing the additives for applications in connectors for consumer electronics that are injection moulded in thermo- plastic polyesters, PET and to a lesser extent PBT. Nofia is also being used in PET film in numerous applications including labelling and insulation, as well as polycarbonate for injection moulding and for sheet and film. The FR does not affect transpar- ency. “We are looking at applications where users want more than just flame retardance,” Lebel says. In September, FRX announced that one of its


32 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2017 www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: CLARIANT


PHOTO: BUDENHEIM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78