search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MATERIALS | TESTING


ViscoIndicator is able to calculate the MFR value of the extruded materials at the standard temperature regardless of the temperature that extrusion is running at. This helps compounders to have a real-time quality control on their products and reduce the failure rates or scraps.”


Figure 2: Comparison of readings from Göttfert’s PVT 500 (top) and its Rheograph 75 with Add-on. Both show the same course, but the isobars are more linear with the PVT 500 so the data can be better approximated with the Tait Model (used to determine the density of the material as a function of the temperature and pressure) Source: Göttfert Werkstoff-Prüfmaschinen


Figure 3: Results from this wall friction test show bulk density of a powder increasing only modestly with increasing normal (compressive) stress. It suggests that the powder is free flowing Source: Ametek Brookfield


tions on the rheological properties of the final products. This would be beneficial for having a window into the process. Also, it helps to realise the optimised percentage of regrind while maintaining the quality in a recycling process.” Dynisco’s ViscoIndicator online rheometer was designed to duplicate the test conditions of a standard melt flow rate tester and monitor the rheological properties – particularly melt flow rate (MFR) and intrinsic viscosity (IV) – of the plastics materials while processing in an extrusion line, Farahanchi said. “Also, the temperature dependency of the flow parameters was correlated by calculating the activation energy of the samples. By considering the value of activation energy,


84 COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019


Powder testing At Ametek Brookfield (Ametek acquired Brookfield Engineering three years ago), Quality Engineer – Rheologist David J Moonay says that with many compounders incorporating a wide variety of solid additives, one concern is how well those powders flow from the hoppers. “A related concern is that some simple tests don’t produce data correlating with flow properties on an industrial scale in the manufacturing plant,” he says. “Mass flow is desired, but most powders flow in a core flow manner. Material flows out through a central channel first, then material along the hopper inner wall.” The shear cell test for powder flowability is based upon sound, fundamental principles, Moonay says. Using that method, Brookfield’s PFT Powder Flow Tester produces meaningful data within a reasonable experimental time, Figure 3. The sample is simply loaded into a circular cell called a sample trough. The system then places successively greater compressive stresses on the sample and shears it in torsion at each stress level to measure inter-particle strength. Various parameters are then automatically calculated and graphed with PC-based software. A complete test takes just 25 minutes. Vaned and smooth lids may be used for flow function and wall friction tests, respectively. Bulk density may also be calculated from the results. The Standard Flow Function test and Wall


Friction test results may be combined and used to calculate hopper design parameters, such as the hopper half-angle and minimum exit diameter to prevent “rat-holing” or arching.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.lacerta-technology.com � www.ametek.com � www.instron.com � www.spectro.com � www.sikora.net � www.tainstruments.com � www.perkinelmer.com � www.zwickroell.com � www.goettfert.com � www.dynisco.com � www.brookfieldengineering.com


www.compoundingworld.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102