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MATERIALS | PPS COMPOUNDS


Table 2: Mould deposit test results for the latest PPS grades from Polyplastic (determined by weight gain after 1,000 shots; mould temperature 140˚C, barrel temperature 340˚C Source: Polyplastics


Another company to introduce high-toughness


grades with improved thermal shock resistance is Polyplastics, which is 45% owned by Celanese (the remainder owned by Daicel Corp of Japan). Up to 2011, Celanese and Polyplastics divided their global market coverage but since then they have been competing around the world and Polyplastics now has sales offices with engineering capabilities in Europe as well as the US. It sells compounds based on linear PPS. Until recently, Durafide 1130T6 (30% glass fibre)


and Durafide 6150T6 (high filler content) were Polyplastics’ leading thermal shock-resistant grades. However, volatiles from the impact modi- fiers used in these grades generated mould deposits, necessitating frequent mould mainte- nance. In addition, the trend toward parts with thinner walls that require materials with higher flow don’t fit well with the need for thermal shock resistance.


Right: Initz has developed special PPS compounds that minimise haze build up in automotive headlamp assemblies


34


Designing a PPS material that has both high flowability and high heat shock resistance has traditionally been a difficult task, says Polyplastics. The company claims to have found an answer to the dilemma with its new highly-filled, high toughness grades Durafide PPS 6150T73 and 6150T8, which are based on modifications to the polymer and improved compounding techniques. Durafide PPS 6150T8 exhibits high flow and improved heat shock resistance while Durafide PPS 6150T73 benefits from even higher heat shock resistance. Both grades also demonstrate low outgassing (low mould deposit) charac- teristics. Polyplastics adds that its ongoing developments include PPS polymer with a reduced level of residual chlorine. It already offers one low-chlorine grade commercially, 1140A66.


COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019


Broadening choice The number of ETP suppliers adding PPS to their portfolios has been rising noticeably over recent years. Late in 2017, Radici Group officially entered the market with its Raditeck P range. “The Raditeck P products were created as part of RadiciGroup’s strategy of expanding its speciality products portfolio,” says Erico Spini, Marketing Manager Europe at RadiciGroup Performance Plastics. The company presented five grades at the show, ranging from a 40% glass-fibre reinforced material to a 65% mixed mineral and glass fibre reinforced compound. It does not say where it sources the base polymer. That was around a year after DSM and Zhejiang NHU Special Materials (NHU), inaugurated a joint venture to produce high performance PPS compounds in China. The JV, announced in 2015, was established in Zhejiang province close to NHU’s linear PPS polymer plant in Shangyu. DSM has a 60% share in DSM NHU Engineering Plastics (Zhejiang) Co, with NHU holding the remaining 40%. Products are branded as Xytron PPS and DSM markets them globally, including China. DSM NHU Engineering Plastics (which assumed


NHU’s existing compounding capacity) commenced operation with two standard commercial grades – Xytron G4010T with 40% glass fibre reinforcement and Xytron M6510A with 65% glass fibre and mineral filler. Recently, it has added a 30% glass reinforced grade and a 40% glass reinforced low-chlorine grade. New options under development include PPS compounds with enhanced wear resistance and low friction, high flow/low flash moulding characteristics, and increased impact strength. Japan’s Teijin and Korean SK Chemicals originally established their PPS joint venture – Initz – back in 2013 to develop, produce and distribute PPS compounds at a 12,000-tonne/yr production plant at Ulsan in Korea. Last August, Initz says it was entering the automotive parts marketplace with what it says is a next-generation PPS that is completely chlorine-free. Initz has commercialised its Ecotran PPS


PHOTO: INITZ


www.compoundingworld.com


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