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MATERIALS | PPS COMPOUNDS


DIC now also has PPS compounding operations in China, Southeast Asia and Europe. Operations in Europe are run by subsidiary Sun Chemical and, this March, the two companies said they would build


their first US production line for PPS compounds


Above: Sensor housings are one of a growing number of demanding applications for PPS


The worldwide market for PPS compounds is


expected to grow by 20% over the period 2017 to 2021 as the volumes of PPS compounds used in vehicle electrical systems and hybrid/electric vehicles – which contain a significant number of components that require superior heat resistance – continue to grow worldwide. Phillips Petroleum’s basic process patent expired in 1984 and that led to other companies introducing their own brands of PPS polymer and compounds products. Celanese, for example, pioneered linear PPS while DIC Corporation in Japan developed its own product line (it began by importing Ryton) as did Tosoh.


Polymerisation moves DIC Corporation says it has been developing straight chain and high molecular weight branched polymers by increasing the molecular weight at the polymerisation reaction stage. “Branched PPS products exhibiting high impact properties, as well as development of grades with improved processing features such as reduced flashing and decreased volatiles, were successfully developed as a result of advanced polymerisation and compounding technologies,” the company says.


at the DIC Imaging Products USA facility at Oak Creek in Wisconsin. It is scheduled to begin operation in autumn 2020 and will raise DIC’s global PPS compound production capacity by 3,000 tonnes/yr to 46,000 tonnes/yr. The Ryton PPS business is now owned by


Solvay, which continues to develop the portfolio and now has linear as well as crosslinked types. In late 2017, the company introduced Ryton R-4-300 polymer, which it said offers improved performance in tensile strength and elongation as well as best-in-class weld-line strength. The material is suitable for thermal management modules and parts where complex geometries require robust mechanical properties. At Fakuma last October, Solvay announced the launch of its first batch of extrusion


Right: Solvay’s Ryton PPS extrusion series is designed to complement its proven injection moulding materials for demanding automotive cooling lines. Continuous use temperatures are up 170°C


GEAR PUMPS | FILTRATION | PELLETIZERS DRYERS | PULVERIZERS


APPLICATIONS COMPOUNDING | MASTERBATCH | MICROPELLETS HOT-MELT ADHESIVES | TPU REACTION | RECYCLING GUM BASE | BIOPOLYMERS | FOAMING PRODUCTS | AND MORE...


See Us at Booth #A114 May 8-9 | Cleveland, OH, USA


maag.com


PHOTO: SOLVAY


PHOTO: SOLVAY


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