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NEWS


Expo to shine spotlight on women in plastics


Panellists in the Women in Plastics debate include (left to right): Lauren Hickey, Jennifer Profitt, Meli Laurance, Candace Sanders and Molly Bridger


Issues surrounding the professional development of women in the US plastics industry will be addressed in a panel discussion at next month’s Plastics Extrusion World Expo, which takes place in Cleveland, Ohio, and runs alongside the Compounding World Expo (previewed on page 39 of this edition). ‘Women in Plastics: Empowering Industry Change’ brings together several high-achieving women from across the world of plastics to share their perspectives on breaking through in this traditionally male-dominated industry. The 45-minute panel will look at the different paths these leaders have taken into the plastics industry, how the workplace


is changing to become more inclusive, and future challenges and opportuni- ties for the next generation of women entering plastics or other manufacturing professions. The panellists include:


n Lauren Hickey, Director of Marketing and Product Management at master- batch manufacturer Americhem;


n Jennifer Profitt, Plant Manager at profile and sidings producer Associ- ated Materials;


n Meli Laurance, Regional Commercial Industry Manager for Plastics at global pigment specialist BASF Colors and Effects; n Candace Sanders,


Assistant Plant Manager at PVC product supplier Genova Products;


n Molly Bridger, Group Director of Marketing at thermoplastic materials manufacturer Simona America. Organised by AMI, the


Plastics Extrusion World Expo and Compounding World Expo take place at the Huntington Convention Center in Cleveland, Ohio, USA on May 8-9, 2019, alongside the Plastics Recycling World Expo. By registering in advance, visitors gain free admission to all three exhibitions, featuring more than 250 suppliers, plus the five conference theatres hosting technical presentations, edu- cational seminars and business debates. To book a free ticket, which is valid for both days of the event, visit: ami.ltd/Register-AMI-Expos


Total in hood film project


Total is one of six partici- pants in Belgium’s Clean Site Circular Project, which aims to recycle pallet shrink hood waste from the construction sector in a closed system back to virgin-equivalent material. Total Polymers devel- oped the film recipe, which uses its Lumicene Super- tough 22ST05, to boost the performance of the recyclates to meet market requirements.


Also involved in the


recycling project are: shrink hood producer Oerlemans Packaging, construction materials firm Wienerberger, recycler Morssinkhof Rymoplast, and building materials association Fema. The project is coordi-


nated by the Belgian extended producer respon- sibility scheme for industrial packaging Valipac, which first implemented the Clean Site System 15 years ago for collection of wrapping films collected from the country’s construc- tion sites. � www.polymers.total.com


Milliken grows in clarifiers


Milliken has started construction of its largest ever clarifier plant at Blacks- burg, in South Carolina in the US. When complete in 2020, the new plant will boost global capacity for the company’s Millad NX 8000 clarifier for PP by about 50%. According to Allen Jacoby, Vice President of Milliken’s Plastic Additives business, Millad NX8000 “is one of the most successful products in the history of plastic additives”. � www.milliken.com


12 COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019 www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: MILLIKEN


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