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NEWS Mexichem expands in Europe


Mexichem Specialty Compounds (MSC) has installed a new production line at its facility at Melton Mowbray in the UK, increasing production capacity by an additional 10,000 tonnes/yr. The additional line will double capacity for the company’s Low Smoke Halogen Free Megolon compounds, where it reports growing demand from wire and cable manufacturers working to meet the latest EU Construction Product Regulation (CPR). “Investing in the ability to rapidly service our customers’ requirements


is at the forefront of this initiative”, said MSC General Manager, Daniel J DeLisle. “While global standards continue to evolve, and while technol- ogy continues to advance, our reaction time to the pace of business is critical to partnering with our customers and meeting their needs.” � www.mexichemspecialtycompounds.com


Above: Mexichem has upped European capacity with an additional line in the UK


Geiger picks Ravago recycled PP


Automotive supplier Geiger Automotive has selected Ravago’s recycled, talcum- filled, heat-stabilised PP – Ma- fill CR HT 5344 H – for the air inlet on the engine radiators in the BMW X3. The parts are made at Geiger’s plant at Suwanee in the US, and are 300-600 mm in size, with wall thicknesses of 1.2-2.0 mm. Mafill CR HT 5344 H is


Ravago’s first globally-availa- ble recycled PP. It meets the same specifications irrespec- tive of where the starting materials are sourced, which is said to have been a key factor in the Geiger decision. “In-house testing has demonstrated that batches from both Europe and overseas are completely identical in quality,” said


Linus Winkler, Director of Supply Chain Management at Geiger. “Changing over on the fly from the European to the US material required no changes to machine parameters. Indeed, the low distortion and dimensional stability of the moulded parts were at the same high level.” � www.resinex.com


Nordson opens up in Münster


Nordson held a ribbon- cutting ceremony last month to mark the opening of the new 14,380 m2


facility at its


Polymer Processing Systems division’s site in Münster,


Germany, which was acquired from Kreyenborg in 2013. The new facility will be the global hub for the compa- ny’s BKG brand of pelletising


systems and melt delivery components, such as screen changers and melt pumps. The investment more than triples the amount of manufacturing, R&D, and office space at the Münster location and brings together capabilities that were previously spread across four separate sites. The facility also includes an enhanced technical centre for R&D and customer trials, as well as an after-market centre for BKG systems and Nordson’s EDI brand of polymer extrusion and fluid coating dies. � www.nordson.com


8 COMPOUNDING WORLD | April 2019


Grafe sets sights on auto ABS


Germany’s Grafe has developed a new colour/ additive combination masterbatch for ABS that the company claims meets the needs of automotive OEMs at lower addition levels.


“Our development goal


here was to reduce the required addition dosage of the colour additive combination masterbatch- es from 6.5% to 4% without compromising quality,” according to Dr Jan Stadermann, who is Head of the Material Sciences department at the company.


Designed to deliver a good surface finish and resistance to sunlight and elevated temperatures, the UV/TS variants can reduce raw material purchasing costs by up to 30% while also offering improved performance, according to Grafe. � www.grafe.com


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: NORDSON


PHOTO: MEXICHEM


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